NEW MUSIC CHALLENGES THE NORM

NEW MUSIC CHALLENGES THE NORM
By Jazz Journalist/Dee Dee McNeil

January 30, 2018

LESLIE PINTCHIK – “YOU EAT MY FOOD, YOU DRINK MY WINE,YOU STEAL MY GIRL!
Pintch Hard Label

Leslie Pintchik, piano; Steve Wilson, alto saxophone; Ron Horton, trumpet/flugelhorn; Shoko Nagai, accordion; Scott Hardy, acoustic & electric bass/acoustic & electric guitar; Michael Sarin, drums; Satoshi Takeisi, percussion.

Ms. Pintchik’s odd title tickles the interest. The first cut is also the CD’s title tune. It’s played at a moderate, funk tempo with horns punctuating the arrangement like pins comfortably sticking into a pin cushion. Leslie Pintchik’s piano talents are obvious from the first several bars of her original music. First, she introduces us to a strong melodic line and then jumps off the bridge without a life jacket, splashing into the improvisational unknown.

The second cut stimulates memories of Ahmad Jamal with Michael Sarin on drums reaching back in time to the unforgettable “Poinciana” percussive brilliance. The tune is “I’m Glad There is You” and as Leslie Pintchik sings this lovely melody on the 88-keys, I cling to every note. She’s passionate. Her rendition of Jerome Kern & Otto Harbach’s haunting “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” is arranged as a spirited Bossa Nova. Scott Hardy showcases a happy and infectious bass solo on this familiar tune.

Who would believe that this outstanding pianist deserted her doctorate in 17th century English Literature at Columbia University, (and her teaching job) to pursue jazz piano? But I’m glad she did! Not only is this woman talented, she’s got book smarts too. Her seven-minute piano dissertation on “Mortal” is sensuous and Steve Wilson’s alto saxophone plays beautifully, interpreting this song vividly through the sensitive bell of his horn. Ron Horton sings like a brass bird on trumpet. This is really a lovely composition and Pintchik gives her band free-reins to gallop through the changes. From the title of some of her original compositions, I’d say this woman has a fair amount of tongue-in-cheek humor. One example is her title tune and the other is a song she calls, “Your Call Will Be Answered by our Next Available Representative In The Order In Which It Was Received. Please Stay On the Line. Your Call Is Important to us.” Very funny! Most of us have been there, done that. Pintchik has composed six of the eight songs on this recording and every one of them is well-written and well-played. I enjoyed each cut and the addition of accordion on a few of the songs was delightful, with Shoko Nagai’s talents on this instrument adding much to mood and arrangements. This is a masterful, musical artist. I listened to her joyful, and sometimes pensive music, for nearly an hour. Then I played it again. I bet you will too.

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BRAD GARTON & DAVE SOLDER – “THE BRAINWAVE MUSIC PROJECT”
Mulatta Record Label

Dave Solder, musician/neuroscientist; Brad Garton, composer/computer-musician; Dan Trueman, hardanger fiddle; Margaret Lancaster, the solo flute; Terry Pender, the mandolin; William Hooker, trap drums.

When the first Avant Garde musical sounds greeted my inquisitive ears, I immediately thought, this is music you play during meditation. That was such an odd thought for me to have, that I went to the liner notes before the first tune, “Bible School Vacation,” had finished playing. I reviewed the titles of the tunes and they were creative. I read, “Taco Tuesday,” “Harajuku Hiccup,” and “Cerebellum, “just to mention a few. This is New Age music, or is it? I wondered. Their publicist referred to it as jazz, classical and electronic music. Once I read the liner notes, I knew I had to share them, just as Jim Eigo at Jazz Promo Services had written them. They completely describe this music and the fascinating way it was created by a neuroscientist and software.

In 2008, musician/neuroscientist, Dave Solder, approached composer/computer-musician, Brad Garton with an idea. Dave (the neuroscientist) had become aware of fairly inexpensive electroencephalograph or EEG sensors that could measure the electrical output of the brain (ie: brainwaves). Working with these sensors over the past ten years, Brad and Dave developed a set of software tools that could generate music using this brainwave data. As they worked out the system, they have played concerts at Rock festivals, … radio stations, …the New York City Opera, colleges, museums and Cornell University. They even played an hour-long PBS TV special. … They are probably the only avant garde music act to be invited to perform at the National Institutes of Health, where they were ivited by the graduate students.

In shows, typically Dave gives a lecture with slides on the brain’s cortical activity and how it senses and produces rhythm. Brad explains how the waves recorded from the cortex are translated to music. Then, they use their own brainwaves or those of guest musicians to compose in real time, generally with the musicians improvising on their instruments.

An interesting question remains, is this music really ‘composed’? If it is not done intentionally, with the brain always controlling the music making, and in this case, it can create music even when asleep or unconscious. The latest version of these tools were used to produce this CD and the software used will soon be freely available. This uses a process of ‘data sonification’ or the translation of a stream of numbers into musical production and control. The raw data is used to trigger and modify synthetic digital musical instruments.

This concept, I find AMAZING!!!!

The EEG signal is made by the neural activity detected by the sensors, but does not reveal any high-level concepts or ideas that are being ‘thought’ (although the brain activity responds to sensory inputs like the touch of the drumhead and sound and activated movements, then is modulated by mental states).

Dave and Brad decided to exploit this feature by creating a feedback loop of sorts with musicians being invited to play along with themselves, thus generating music with brainwaves resulting from the process of generating that music. For this first complete recording of “The Brainwave Music Project”, four soloists were invited to take part in the sessions. Each plays a solo instrument and the instruments themselves each come laden with a rich musical tradition. The hardanger fiddle, played by Dan Trueman; a solo flute by Margaret Lancaster; Terry Pender on the mandolin and the trap drums played by William Hooker all represent long social and cultural histories. This awareness, as well as the awareness of what and how the musicians are playing, is certainly a part of the brainwave data used to build the synthetic accompaniment for each piece.

I invite you to indulge yourself in this odd listening experience of an even odder musical creation.

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JAMISON ROSS – ALL FOR ONE
Concord Records

Jamison Ross, vocals/drums/composer; Rick Lollar, guitars/background vocals/composer; Chris Pattishall, piano; Cory Irvin, Hammond B-3 organ/Fender Rhodes/Wurlitzer/background vocals; Barry Stephenson, bass.

Jamison Ross is an R&B artist who infuses his music with jazz and brings a fresh, new perspective to the forefront of crossover airplay. At times, he reminds me of Jeffrey Osborne. Not in tone or originality, but in his ability to sing pop or rhythm and blues or jazz with the same effectiveness. He offers us sincerity and freshness. His voice is a rainbow of colors that cross the musical genres with ease and beauty. Additionally, he is a competent drummer, composer and bandleader. As a musician/drummer, Ross won the Thelonius Monk Institute of Jazz International Drum Competition and released his premiere disc as a result of that prestigious award in 2015. This CD expands his talent dimensions by adding ‘vocalist’ to his list of credits.

Starting with his first song, “A Mellow Good Time,” composed by Allen Toussaint, the party begins. “Unspoken” is an original composition by Ross & cowriter, Richard Lollar. The lyrics are poignant, about a couple finding distance between them because one is always gone, but their unspoken commitment keeps them strong. The rhythm is unusual and the soulful melody is tinged with blues. Jamison Ross wrote this song for his wife, Adrienne. But I am really struck by his interpretation of Etta Jone’s hit song, “Don’t Go To Strangers”. He interprets this song beautifully and I believe it’s the first time I’ve heard a man tackle this lyric. Pianist, Chris Pattishall gives solid support during his heart-rending arrangement.

The tone and style of this vocalist/musician is uniquely fresh and endearing. His voice is unforgettable and that is an important factor when you are establishing your artistry. Mose Allison’s “Everybody’s Cryin Mercy” is another touch of jazz and once again showcases this artist’s delightful vocal stylings. His original composition, “Safe In The Arms of Love” sings like a prayer. Once again, I’m struck by this vocalist’s style and tone. The Latin rhythm underneath a lilting melody adds interest and features Ross’s percussive mastery. Perhaps this artist best describes his own product in his liner notes.

“All For One is the second chapter to my story as an artist with a deep understanding of American music. I continue to explore the aroma of jazz using elements of gospel, soul and R&B. I utilize the organ as my string orchestra, tugging as much emotion from a composition as possible. Just like a Sunday morning, I use the soul of my voice to shape a message with conviction with the use of traditional R&B. I preach the need for the world’s love to be united.”

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STEVE SLAGLE – “DEDICATION”
Panorama Records

Steve Slagle, alto/soprano saxophones & flute/composer; Lawrence Fields, piano; Scott Colley, bass; Bill Stewart, drums; Roman Diaz, conga/percussion; Dave Stryker, guitar.

Steve Slagle has composed the majority of these songs, dedicating each one of the nine compositions recorded to a special character or thing directly related to his musical journey. For example, the first tune that comes busting out the gate is “Sun Song.” He dedicated it to the great Sonny Rollins. Although Slagle admires the tone and talent of Rollins, he definitely has his own unique sound.

Slagle was once, many years ago, a member of Carla Bley’s band when bassist/composer Steve Swallow nicknamed him “Niner”. That’s what tune number two represents, the nickname given and one he fondly embraces. Both of these tunes Swing hard and bebop across my room, filling it with energy and ebullience.

As a leader, Slagle is in command at all times. But it’s his bandmates who keep the grooves going strong beneath his flurry of notes and improvisational treks. “Major In Come” flies like a sparrow on amphetamines. This title has a double meaning. It’s built on major chords in five different keys and it’s meant to challenge his band to Swing at an incredible and challenging pace. Lawrence Fields on piano does not disappoint, given several bars to showcase his versatile and improvised solo. Bassist, Scott Colley pounds out the time and grooves hard, hammering the rhythm section together by locking time succinctly with drummer Bill Stewart. On Stewart’s solo, you hear the fire and passion in each stroke of his sticks.

“Triste Beleza” that translates to ‘beautiful sadness’ was composed in tribute to the amazing and spirited music that has come out of Brazil. It sounds a wee bit like ‘Speak Low’, but quickly presents a very different melody for the band to embellish. Stryker adds his guitar magic on this song.

All in all, here is a well-produced album of well-played and excellent compositions by Steve Slagle. He has composed seven of the nine tunes and recorded one song written by his special guest, Dave Stryker titled “Corazon” and included the Wayne Shorter composition, “Charcoal Blues.” This is an album full of excitement and East Coast energy. On “Opener”, another one of my favorites, Roman Diaz makes this production shine with his percussive excellence. Slagle adds a flute towards the end of the tune that lifts the production to higher heights. And by the way, I love the artwork created for the inside cover by Ivan Pazlamatchev and titled for Slagle’s first cut, “Sun Song.” Most of these songs are full of heat and power, like the sun itself. This album is burning hot!

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HART, SCONE & ALBIN – “LEADING THE BRITISH INVASION”
Zoho Roots

John Hart, guitar; Adam Scone, Hammond organ; Rudy Albin Petschauer, drums.

Opening with Amy Winehouse’s popular hit song, “Rehab” this guitar trio paints the tune in bright, happy colors. They’ve speeded the song tempo up, but I think Miss Winehouse would have approved. John Hart, on guitar, is upfront and personal on his instrument, improvising at a steady speed and setting the bar high for Adam Scone on his Hammond B3 Organ. Rudy Albin Petschauer keeps his fellow musicians grounded with solid drum rhythm. Petschauer was a former member of organist Jack McDuff’s group and McDuff was one of my favorite organists back-in-the-day. Adam Scone is said to build his sound from the bottom up on his organ. That means his bass footwork locks in with the drums and represents what it takes to be a real organ player. You can tell, because you don’t miss a bass player on this recording. Then comes John Hart, an adventurous guitar player who is gifted in both rhythm guitar, blues and improvisational solo work. His electronic sound adds spice to this recording and plays nicely off of Scones organ sounds. Hart, like Petschauer, also was a Jack McDuff bandmate. On “Look of Love” the trio’s sound settles into a Bossa Nova groove and Hart proves that he can cover all styles. Now his guitar is more acoustic, nylon string-sounding, and his approach is sweet and tender, even when he double-times his improvisational solo. On this tune, he showcases his inventiveness. I hardly recognized Sade’s “Smooth Operator” tune. They’ve arranged it as a shuffle and it really swings hard. You’ll also enjoy a couple of Adele’s songs on this recording and Pop Star, Joss Stone’s “Don’t Start Lyin’ To Me Now’ is incorporated into their line-up. For this reviewer, some of the fuzzy guitar parts and the rock influenced arrangements interrupt the pure jazz concept of a Jimmy Smith or McDuff band, but that’s a matter of listener taste. It was especially annoying on Adele’s “Rolling In the Deep.” But the trio redeemed themselves on “Blues for the U.K., composed by John Hart.

Perhaps Adam Scone explained the groups concept the best in their liner notes.

“All great organ groups take popular songs and use them as vehicles to churn out organ style hits. … We focus on the modern music of the UK, but follow in the footsteps of the masters.”<

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One Response to “NEW MUSIC CHALLENGES THE NORM”

  1. Dedication – Steve Slagle Says:

    […] Source: https://musicalmemoirs.wordpress.com/2018/01/30/new-music-challenges-the-norm/ […]

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