Archive for October, 2017

DAZZLING NEW TALENT PAINTS JAZZ WITH FRESH FACES

October 25, 2017

DAZZLING NEW TALENT PAINTS JAZZ WITH FRESH FACES
By Dee Dee McNeil – jazz journalist

October 25, 2017

The amount of new and creative music I receive is to be celebrated. Starting with THE MYRON MCKINNEY TRIO, freshly formed in 2014, led by the musical conductor of Earth Wind & Fire, bursting with composer creativity and great musicianship. Haunting. Beautiful. Melodic. Soothing. Melancholy. These are the adjectives that come to mind when the very first cut of GUILLERMO NOJECHOWICZ’s CD spins off my Compact disc player. Vocalist, GABRIELE TRANCHINA has recorded an album featuring several of her talented husband’s compositions. STEVE HECKMAN & MATT CLARK share their saxophone/piano duo sessions and WADADA LEO SMITH christens an entire album of Thelonious Monk music with his solo trumpet. Conductor/composer, CHUCK OWEN and THE JAZZ SURGE offer orchestrated compositions that celebrate Owen’s great love for the outdoors. LUPA SANTIAGO & ANDERS VESTERGARD QUARTET make a memorable statement combining Latin, Brazilian, Contemporary and Straight-ahead jazz with hybrid rhythms. Finally, bassist JEFF DINGLER composes all the songs on an album produced to encompass American Jazz and Ethiopian influences. Here are a group of dazzling new and also seasoned talents, who paint jazz with fresh faces.

MYRON McKINLEY TRIO – “TIME” EP
Yah Entertainment / S.M. Entertainment

Myron McKinley, piano; Ian Martin, bass; Stacey Lamont Sydnor, drums.

A rich, dynamic roll of drums open this EP. They are recorded with precision and sound ‘live’ and inspired. The tune is called “Baidoa” and when Myron McKinley’s piano enters, it sprints across the space like a track runner gliding easily around the track. This trio moves in synchromesh. They’re tightly bound and their sound is lovely. The treble improvisation McKinley plays on the grand piano brings light and luster to his bass player’s solo, softly and effectively played beneath Ian Martin’s improv. This song is nine minutes long and never boring. I enjoyed every nuance; every note; every solo. The next song, “Labyrinth” has a smooth jazz sound. McKinley is now on electric keyboard and the group sounds more contemporary. Perhaps he was always on electric piano. Today, synthesized keyboards are made to sound just like a grand piano. I have no liner notes to check the instrumentation. Just my ears and they are pleased with what they hear.

I find this second composition not as memorable as the first one, but it is still well-played. “E-12” is the next piece and it’s more energetic with a smart melody. Suddenly it moves from energy to ballad. There are several time changes that keep this piece interesting and feature McKinley’s two- handed arpeggios and melodies played in unison, using two-fisted octaves. The bassist is busy and solidifies the free-form improvisation of drums and piano with his solid strokes. The ballad explodes into a flight of flying fingers and percussive brilliance.

All three of these musicians exhibit amazing talents. The commercial recording of Eleanor Rigby is electronic and funky. This trio can play it all. Stacey Lamont Sydnor on drums is powerful and steady, putting the ‘funk’ in the arrangement and pushing the trio to their highest limits. All the while, they keep the jazz reined in and obvious, never losing their ability to improvise, while the music dances and pulsates. Finally, “Man in the Mirror” made so famous by Michael Jackson, is interpreted like another Smooth Jazz arrangement with a little Country/ Western twist. It’s flavored liberally with strings.

The video below includes Verdine White and Stanley Clarke making guest appearances.

The Myron McKinley Trio officially formed in 2014 and recently appeared at the Belasco Theater in Los Angeles. It all began when they were performing at NAMM and a fan posted a video on Facebook. That clip went viral. Each member has an impressive list of credits. McKinley, who is the music director and keyboardist for Earth, Wind & Fire, has also worked with Chaka Khan, Mary J. Blige, Harry Connick Jr., Stevie Wonder, Whitney Houston and Tupac. Bassist, Ian Martin, has teamed with David Foster, Barry Manilow and Barbra Streisand. Percussionist Stacey Lamont Sydnor has collaborated with The Jacksons, P. Diddy and Alicia Keys, among others. Together, they make a formidable group, blending their unique approach to jazz with R&B/funk overtones, composing fresh and interesting songs, and painting familiar tunes with spontaneity and dazzling talent.

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GUILLERMO NOJECHOWICZ – “Puerto de Buenos Aires 1933”
Zoho Records

Guillermo Nojechowicz, drums/percussion/vocals; Helio Alves, piano; Fernando Huergo, bass; Kim Nazarian, vocals/percussion; Marco Pignataro, tenor & soprano saxophone; Brian Lynch, trumpet. SPECIAL GUESTS: Franco Pinna, bombo leguero/percussion; Roberto Cassan, accordion; Megumi Lewis, violin; Ethan Wood, violin; Sarah Darling, viola; Leo Eguchi, cello; Nando Michelin,string arrangements.

Haunting. Beautiful. Melodic. Soothing. Melancholy. These are the adjectives that come to mind when the very first cut of Guillermo Nojechowicz’s CD spins off my Compact disc player. This tune is based on a Uruguayan rhythm and Italian accordion player, Roberto Cassan, (R.I.P) adds a Piazzolla-esque quality to the arrangement. I learned that this musician died in Italy from a heart attack shortly after completing this recording. As I listened, I looked at the album title and wondered, what does the year 1933 mean to this artist? I found out in the liner notes, where Mr. Nojechowicz wrote:

“This project has been developed through many years. It began on one of my trips to Buenos Aires when I found a passport issued in the early 1930s with images of my grandmother and my dad. … I knew they came to Argentina to escape the economic hardships at the time. … Those who stayed behind, died in the concentration camps.”

The title, “Puerto de Buenos Aires” translates to “Port of Buenos Aires.” I’ve been to that thriving metropolis and you find many Germans who settled there and have lived there since the Second World War. Many Nazi’s also escaped to Buenos Aires after the war. It’s a lovely city with wide avenues, sometimes 8 lanes across.

“The music is very image-driven. … I tried to picture my grandmother in the 1930s, …winter, taking the train with a little kid, my dad, who at the time was three-years-old. What emerged for me was the pain, the difficulty of moving to a new country; not knowing the language or the culture. So yeah – it’s very personal, from a very dark time,” Guillermo Nojechowicz continued explaining his project concept.

The second track, “Trains” continues to perpetuate historic images. Nazarian’s beautiful voice sings “Oh my son, we must go very far, time has come for us to leave our home” and the music moves at a lumbering pace, in 7/4 time, with Njechowicz’s drums conjuring up the Euro-rail system that helped his grandmother escape her homeland. Kim Nazarian’s voice stretches across octaves and soars with emotion and spontaneity. Helio Alves on piano is an intricate part of this perfect rhythm section and Fernando Huergo tells heartfelt stories with his bass solo on Track three, “Europe 1933.” Guillermo Nojecowicz is quite a composer and has written eight of the ten songs on this project. His melodies are stunning and his band knows just how to best interpret his work. Brian Lynch on trumpet and Marco Pignataro punch the horn lines with gusto and sometimes include Nazarian as a third vocal horn. The blend is lovely.

Here is a musical photo album of another time and place, propelled by Nojechowicz’s sense of time and space on drums and the magic accompaniment of his musician friends. He incorporates many world rhythms, including the Argentinean chacarera that pumps life in the “Puerto de Buenios Aires” composition, implementing the Brazilian single-string percussion instrument and he also incorporates the ‘talking drum’ in his work. This is an exciting album of new jazz music, flavored delicately with World Music and telling emotional stories of his life and family history.

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GABRIELE TRANCHINA – “OF SAILING SHIPS AND THE STARS IN YOUR EYES”
Rainchant Electric Records

Gabriele Tranchina, vocals; background vocals; Joe Vincent Tranchina, keyboards/melodica/programming/claves/background voices/composer; Carlo de Rose, upright & electric bass; Vince Cherico, drums/percussion; Renato Thomas, percussion.

Gabriele Tranchina’s light, second soprano voice bounces across these tunes with a happy tone. Several of the songs are composed and arranged by her husband, Joe Vincent Tranchina, who also co-produced along with producer, Rick Savage. Mr. Tranchina is a fine composer and his wife takes care to color his compositions with emotional character. On “Bossa Ballad and Blue” Carlo de Rose lays down a lovely bass solo. I wish the composer had believed in his vocalist enough to let her sell his challenging melody without him playing it on the piano along with her vocals. That was annoying. Still, Mrs. Tranchina pulls it off.

She also sings in both Portuguese and French on this project, using Jobim’s “O Morro Nao Tem Vez” to showcase a Brazilian flair and “Je Crois Entendre Encore” to feature her French language skills. Later in the CD she features more linguist skills, singing fluently in Spanish. With all the advantage of language use and unique compositions, this vocalist reflects a cross between Easy Listening and World Music. However, I found her voice so similar to so many others I’ve heard, that it made her somewhat banal as a singer.

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STEVE HECKMAN & MATT CLARK – “SOME OTHER TIME/SLOW CAFÉ”
World City Music

Steve Heckman, tenor & soprano saxophone; Matt Clark, piano.

Starting with a tune Steve Heckman has penned titled, “Admiring-Lee,” he and pianist Matt Clark are off and running ‘straight-ahead’ down a jazzy path. This duo’s first tune is followed by Thelonious Monk’s popular composition, “Ugly Beauty”. Here is an acoustic jazz performance in it’s pure form; just two talented musicians, both august and sincere in their approach.

This duo has chosen to perform songs we know and love. They weave their talents around the music like homespun sweaters. Their music is warm and comfortable; unobtrusive, yet culturally opulent. For example, after Monk, they delve into a familiar tune from the 1944 musical, ‘On the Town,’ titled, “Some Other Time.” It’s a beautiful and poignant ballad that let’s each artist experiment and improvise.

Pianist, Matt Clark adds one self-penned composition on this project titled, “Foregone Conclusions”. He’s composed a jazz waltz whose melody Heckman sings, using his soprano saxophone. Clark gets to stretch the 88-key limits during his solo. His talents were honed at Oberlin College and he is a proud protégé of Detroit’s Iconic pianist, Barry Harris. Clark has played with my dear friend and reed man, Teddy Edwards, with Frank Morgan, and vibraphonist, Bobby Hutcherson among other luminaires like Vincent Herring, Eric Alexander, Madeline Eastman and Kellye Gray. Matt Clark is also the founding member of the Marcus Shelby Trio, a mainstay on the San Francisco, California jazz scene.

His duo partner, Steve Heckman, is a renowned reed man who’s worked with Chet Baker, Howard McGhee, Andrew Hill, Benny Green, Eddie Henderson, guitarist John Abercrombie, drummers Billy Higgins and Donald Bailey. He’s also accompanied vocalists like Jackie Ryan, Julie Kelly, Judy Wexler and more. Heckman’s been featured on several albums with other great jazz players and his fifth solo album, “Legacy: A Coltrane Tribute” received rave reviews and was played nationwide. I suspect this album will receive the same kind of appreciation and exposure.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdTr7_4fLgM (a group video at Yoshi’s in San Francisco)

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WADADA LEO SMITH – “REFLECTIONS AND MEDITATIONS ON MONK”
Tum Records

Wadada Leo Smith, trumpet.

Here is a bold and beautiful solo statement to celebrate both the birth and life of Thelonious Monk. 100 years ago, this historic and profoundly impactful pianist/composer came into being and still influences our universe with music that lives boldly, like the air we breathe.How tenacious for Wadada Leo Smith to step out on a stage, naked and alone, in order to play music that respects and revels this iconic jazz master.

Unafraid and totally prepared, Wadada Leo Smith was part of the first generation of musicians to come out of Chicago’s Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM). Over years, he has established himself as a leading composer and performer of creative, contemporary music. Smith has received awards for Jazz Artist of the Year, Jazz Album of the Year (for America’s National Parks) and Trumpeter of the Year in DownBeat’s 65th Annual Critics Poll. He was named Musician of the Year by the Jazz Journalist Association.

Wadada Leo Smith opens with “Ruby, My Dear.” He wanders around the melody line, like an inquisitive sleuth. For nine plus moments, he probes the entire meaning of this Monk composition. His trumpet sings with stamina and determination. On “Reflections” he mutes his trusty trumpet and tenderly caresses this composition with tonal abilities that come from years of study and practice.

In his liner notes, Mr. Smith shares: “Most people would never realize that I am closer to Thelonious Monk than to any other artist. What connects us is a vision of composition and its forms, music psychology, and our articulation of the ensemble as a trashing field for new information.”

Speaking of composing, Wadada Leo Smith has composed three works of art for this project. One is called, “Monk and the Five Point Ring at the Fire Spot Café.” The second is titled, “Adagio: Monkishness – A Cinematic Vision of Monk Playing Solo Piano.” The final piece is called, “Monk and Bud Powell at Shea Stadium – A Mystery.”

When speaking about his composing skills, Smith wrote:

“In the 1950s, I began to think of myself as a composer after getting my first trumpet and writing my first piece at the age of twelve. I started buying records by Bird, Dizzy, Monk and others. …Out of everything I heard, it was Monk, his ideas of a band and composition, that were the closest to what I dreamed of being as an artist. … I would go back and forth between him and Duke Ellington, …but Monk had the upper hand in the end. … The essence of Monk is, I believe, in his solo performances. Even in live performances, with his band, he always played unaccompanied solos. So, what does that mean? To me, that means that Monk now has a chance to be as fluent as he can be in his own musical language without any other distractions. He does not have to play with anybody. He plays with himself.”

That’s what you will hear on this recording, a trumpet artist playing by himself, without a rhythm section or harmony. A soloist, interpreting his innermost feelings through the bell of his horn and singing his song, like a giant, metallic bird, throwing his emotions boldly into the wind.

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CHUCK OWEN AND THE JAZZ SURGE – “WHISPERS ON THE WIND”
Mama Records

Chuck Owen, accordian/Hammond dulcimer/conductor;Per Danielsson, piano; Corey Christiansen, dobro/nylonstrin,steel string, 12-string guitars; LaRue Nickelson, guitar; Mark Neuenschwander, bass; Danny Gottlieb, drums;WOODWINDS: Tamara Danielsson, Valerie Gillespie, Jack Wilkins, Rex Wertz, & Matt Vance; TRUMPETS: Frank Greene, Jay Coble, Mike Iapichino & Clay Jenkins; TROMBONES: Keith Oshiro, Tom Brantley, Jerald Shynett & Jim Hall (bass trombone). FEATURED GUEST SOLOISTS: Randy Brecker, trumpet; Gregoire Maret, harmonica; Sara Caswell, violin.

Chuck Owen is the producer of this orchestrated recording project that has brought the wild, wild west into a jazz album with vivid arrangements and super talented players. Growing up in Omaha, Nebraska, Owen had a great love for the outdoors and the gifts that nature bestows on a small boy’s imagination. This project endeavors to reach back to nostalgic memories of wind, weather, tradition, simple values and lifestyles and to create an ode to cowboys, colorful heroes and folklore. I might as well be listening to the musical backdrop of a Western motion picture, when I listen to “Warped Cowboy”. The poignant violin solo of Sara Caswell sets the scene and the other instrumentation colors the piece with wind and spacious skies, painted by tones that celebrate the great American outdoors. The drums thunder like Indian pony hooves against the dusty plains. Owen has intentionally used a number of traditional instruments from that era of American development and culture inclusive of harmonica, dobro, accordion, violin, steel guitar and hammered dulcimer.

This is the sixth release for Chuck Owen and the Jazz Surge. All have been critically acclaimed. As a recipient of the 2009 Guggenheim Fellowship, Owen has had his compositions performed by the Netherlands’ Metropole Orchestra, the Aarhus Jazz Orchestra I Denmark, the Brussels Jazz Orchestra and Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra. As a distinguished professor at the University of South Florida, he has spent thirty-five years as a celebrated jazz educator, a guest conductor, clinician and lecturer. Chuck Owen currently serves as President / founder of ISJAC, (International Society of Jazz Arrangers & Composers). Previously he served as President of IAJE (International Association for Jazz Education). He continues to give opportunity and inspiration to young jazz musicians by composing works that challenge their talents and creativity. This project is a strong example of the results of such challenges.

On track #2, “All Hat, No Saddle”, Corey Christiansen’s guitar solo made me sit up and take note. Then came “A Phares of the Heart” where the harmonica of Gregoire Maret sweetly spiced this lovely ballad, along with Per Danielsson’s tinkling piano keys. Both Clay Jenkins on solo trumpet and Rex Wertz on tenor saxophone made pertinent and memorable musical statements. One moment the arrangements are folk-like and background music and then someone like Randy Brecker on trumpet swings into the picture and elevates a song like “Into the Blue” to pure blissful jazz. LaRue Nickerson’s electric guitar adds a swift pulse to the arrangement and Chuck Owen has composed something that crosses jazz genres from straight-ahead to contemporary; from folk to funk.

This is an artistic and creative project exploiting the wonderful talents of Southern Florida’s skillful jazz musicians, along with the composition skills, arrangements and conductorship of Chuck Owen. Owen’s influences seem grounded in eclectic jazz tradition, yet he blends classical, folk and rock music with funk and contemporary colors. He is a painter with sound. My ears were on the edge of their seat the whole time this album played.

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LUPA SANTIAGO & ANDERS VESTERGARD QUARTET – “INSIDE TURNABOUT”
Drum Voice Records

Lupa Santiago, guitar; Anders Vestergard, drums; Rodrigo Ursaia, saxophone; Mattias Hjorth, bass.

This project is explosive. From the very first strains of guitar and drums, the title tune sets the bar high by a musical ensemble that is bursting with energy and excitement. “Inside Turnabout” was recorded outside Malmo, Sweden. It was the result of touring, collaborating and ultimately composing with Brazilian saxophonist, Rodrigo Ursaia. Ursaia and Santiago are longtime musical friends, so the collaboration was comfortable. It just so happened they wound up touring Europe at the same time and seized that opportunity to experiment with a new group and a new repertoire. This album is the result of that experiment. Santiago, Vestergard and Ursaia do all the composing. Mattias Hjorth holds everything solidly in place with his bass, bringing a contemporary flair to the project. Vestergard locks the rhythm down, hard as a mallot. Ursaia’s saxophone is pure jazz, always satin smooth and improvisational atop a mixture of Latin, Brazilian and hybrid rhythms, woven into Straight-ahead feels and contemporary jazz stylings.

The title tune gives Vestergard a chance to cut loose on his drum set and his improvisational solo is stunning and powerful. He has composed this first tune and it allows all the musicians to freely improvise and exhibit their strongest talents. “Caixa Cubo” is played at a more moderate pace. Ursaia takes the lead on saxophone, with Vestergard invigorated and ever-present, showering percussive excellence in support of the production. Enter Santiago on guitar, moving smoothly from a stellar solo back to the rhythm section and often doubling the melody with Ursaia, very effectively. The “New Houser” composition gives us an insight into the composer talents of guitarist, Lupa Santiago.

All three composers on this recording present polished pieces of music for the band to interpret. The grooves are tightly woven, like an acrobat’s net, where the others can bounce and explore. This is an imaginative and high-energy project that celebrates the diverse and excellent talents of four astronomical musicians. They are musically and spiritually locked, like four hands pressed tightly together in prayer.

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JEFF DINGLER – “IN TRANSIT”
Independent Label

Jeff Dingler,bassist/composer; Brad Shepik, guitar; Lou Rainone, piano; Gusten Rudolph, drums; Josh Bailey, percussion.

Jeff Dingler has composed every song on this project. He has expanding his jazz experience from being a member of Nelson Riddle’s Orchestra to stints with several trios and quintets over the years. With an ear for eclectic music and an interest in travel and cultures, Dingler has blended various genres into these compositions. This project is highly influenced by his current experience in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, where he is teaching Bass Music Theory and Composition at Mekene Yesus University. The transition of his musical experiences and years of playing bass, from blues and swing to bebop, are now combined with Ethiopian culture and African styles of music.

Brad Shepik shines on guitar, dancing across the strong drums of Gusten Rudolph and the percussion of Josh Bailey. Together, they set up a groove where pianist Lou Rainone can play fluidly. Shepik plays rhythm guitar and also offers a strong solo on “Bati Celebration.” Dingler’s melody is catchy and memorable on this first album tune. On “Orange Clouds” you hear more of Dingler’s strong bass line that grounds this ballad in blues and contemporary smooth jazz changes. His tender solo is the star of this composition. I found myself fascinated by the “Addis Blues”composition. I could hear all the African influences in the minor blues changes of this song. Rainone’s piano improvisation tinkles like bells in a distant marketplace and once again, Dingler takes time to share a lyrical solo on bass. “Tiptoe” might be my favorite tune, getting back to a straight-ahead, melodically lyrical feel. This is an interesting jazz album that dabbles in World Music and blends cultures. It tickles the imagination and reminds us that music is limitless.

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ANGEL VOICES & WORLDLY MUSICAL CHOICES

October 14, 2017

ANGEL VOICES & WORLDLY MUSICAL CHOICES
CD reviews by Jazz Journalist/Dee Dee McNeil

October 14, 2017

I am happy to see so much young talent popping up on the jazz scene, like the very talented MARIE SCHAFER. Even more importantly, it’s good to see so many women who are bringing their concern and nurturing spirits to the forefront in order to protest war, the disparaging of women and peace on earth with various voices of protest like SINNE EEG,JULIE BENKO, LESLIE LEWIS and even journalist turned singer, RONDI CHARLESTON. LYN STANLEY reminds us that the Great American songbook is alive and well with the help of excellent Los Angeles based musicians. Pianist/composer, CAROL ROMAN creates music for the departed and in hopes that we never forget nine-eleven in New York City. The group, NEOTOLIA,featuring vocalist NAZAN NIHAL and composer, UTAR ARTUN bring us World Music from Turkey, with a little help from featured vocalist, JOEY BLAKE and CORINA BARTRA combines cultures, exploring jazz as an Afro-Peruvian vocalist. It’s eye-opening to see how much jazz has touched the music of other countries and encouraged freedom and protest. These artists have veered away from the predictable and mundane. Here are my reviews of angel voices and other worldly music choices.

MARIE SCHAFER – “TO KNOW LOVE”
Marsch Music

Maria Schafer, vocals; Shane Savala, guitar; Joe Butts, bass; Kyle Sharamitaro, drums; Brad Black, trumpet.

This CD opens with the familiar, “You Don’t Know What Love Is” but it’s freshly arranged with only percussion and bass laying like a carpet of musical excellence for the vocalist to strut her stuff. Shane Savala’s flamingo sounding guitar adds a lovely flavor to the production. Ms. Schafer offers sweet vocal improvisation and there is a splatter of Latin percussion implemented. “The More I See You” is performed rubato at the top and moves into a slow swing with the bass pumping like a weightlifter. This vocalist is a throw-back to the days of June Christy or Chris Conner. When Marie Schafer breaks into a foreign language on the third album cut, “Estrada Branco”, I am enchanted. It’s a Jobim/De Moraes composition, featuring only guitar accompaniment. Ms. Schafer lets the listening world know that she can hold her own in the simplicity of this duo moment. However, there is nothing simple about Schafer’s improvisational skills and satin-smooth tone. She is a master of her craft.

Here is a collection of familiar, standard songs, that sound brand new because of their outstanding and creative arrangements. An example of one unique arrangement was when I heard her sing “Estate” with only bass and drums. Impressive!
Obviously, Schafer can sooth or swing at the drop of a beat. This is clearly visible on “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered,” where tempos melt into each other , labeling this arrangement both challenging and creative. Whatever her musicians do, they only enhance Marie Schafer’s style and beauty. She is the diamond necklace hanging around the necks of these band members and glittering brightly.

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LYN STANLEY – “THE MOONLIGHT SESSIONS – VOLUME TWO”
A.T. Music LLC

Lyn Stanley, piano; Mike Garson, Christian Jacob, Tamir Hendelman, piano; Chuck Berghofer, bass; Ray Brinker, Bernie Dresel, Joe LaBarbera, drums; Luis Conte, percussion; John Chiodini, guitar; Chuck Findley, trumpet/flugelhorn; Rickey Woodard, tenor saxophone; Bob McChesney, trombone; Hendrik Meukens, harmonica; Corky Hale, Carol Robbins, harp; Budapest Scoring Symphonic Orchestra, strings.

Lyn Stanley has consistently turned out a string of albums that celebrate the great American songbook, interpreting songs we know and love. Her smooth, silky sound embellishes the lyrics, stroking the melodies with husky vocal intention. Stanley always employs the best of Southern California’s jazz musician scene when she records. This heightens her compact discs with creative excellence. You will enjoy fourteen standard songs that sing her story and feature songs that reflect Stanley’s own life and heartbreak. The addition of strings by the Budapest Scoring Symphonic Orchestra, combined with top horn players like Rickey Woodard on tenor saxophone, Chuck Findley on trumpet/flugelhorn and Bob McChesney on trombone, make this project not only jazz, but Easy Listening.

Ms. Stanley has a rich alto range and emotional sensibilities to color each tune with believability. This comes from living life to the fullest and turning those life lessons into a musical diary, using deep and memorable compositions. The classical piano of Christian Jacob on “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” is stunningly fresh, with a musical introduction that allows Ms. Stanley to surprise us with the Judy Garland standard when she enters the song vocally. Nice! Chuck Findley’s muted trumpet on “You’ve Changed” adds interest and art to her vocal presentation, although she is somewhat whinny at times. Woodard’s bluesy, tenor saxophone puts sassy sexiness into Stanley’s rendition of “Since I Fell For You.”

Here is a production and voice that will please and entertain you for years to come.

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INTRODUCING JULIE BENKO
Independent Label

Julie Benko, vocals; Jason Yeager, piano; Danny Weller, bass; Jay Sawyer, drums; Andy Warren, trumpet; Dan Levinson, clarinet; Walter Harris, trombone; Andrew Mulherkar, tenor saxophone; Vinny Raniolo, guitar; Jason Anick, violin; JP Jofre, bandoneon; Alon Bisk, cello.

There is a Dixieland-feel to this songbird’s production on the very first cut of her debut CD. Titled, “Tomorrow is a Day For You.” It’s a joyful composition penned by Benko and she explains in the liner notes that she wrote it as a celebration following the US Supreme Court decisions defending same-sex marriage. She has penned three songs on this project and all relate to her response to the world around her.

“Matchmaker, Matchmaker,” from the Broadway production, seems to mirror this vocalist’s sensibilities and style. Obviously, Julie Benko has ‘pipes’; a slang for very strong vocals. She sings with power and gusto. I recognized immediately that she has a stage voice ready to soar onto Broadway stages. When I later read her bio, I discovered I was right. She recently performed on Broadway in ‘Fiddler on the Roof.’

I enjoyed the Jason Anick violin solo on “Love For Sale”. The Jason Yeager arrangement is lovely, presenting the old standard as a tango. This vocalist executes the song well, but I don’t believe her when she interprets the lyrics. This is important, because part of the singers duty is to sell her musical stories to the listening public. Still, Ms. Benko has chosen a number of other recognizable and popular songs to interpret and for the most part, she is very successful. Ms. Benko has co-produced this album with her pianist, Jason Yeager and I would distinguish her as a musical theater vocalist with pop overtones.
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SINNE EEG – “DREAMS”
An ArtistShare fan funded project

Sinne Eeg, vocals/composition; Jacob Christoffersen, piano; Larry Koonse, guitar; Joey Baron, drums; Scott Colley, bass; background vocals, Sinne Eeg, Warny Mandrup, Lasse Nilsson & Jenny Nilsson.

Here is a female artist who can compose as well as sing. It’s always a plus when you add songwriting talents to your recording project. Ms. Eeg opens with “The Bitter End” which has a country/blues feel. I wish Koonse, on guitar, had over-dubbed some really down and dirty blues guitar to embellish the vocalist’s arrangement. However, the composition itself is well-written and Larry Koonse is steady and tenacious on rhythm guitar. On “Head Over High Heels,” Sinne Eeg shows off her scatting skills. Her vocals are smooth and warm as sweet butter on hot waffles. The thing that draws you into this artist’s presentation is her rich, honest, tonal quality. I appreciate Sinne Eeg not being whinny or nasal, but singing full voice, squeezing emotion out of each lyrical expression with sincerity. “Love Song” is another original composition and quite beautiful. Scott Colley’s big bass sound solidifies the ballad and grounds the arrangement. The double bass is as solid as cement. With only drums to accompany her voice, she swings her way into the familiar tune, “What Is This Thing Called Love.” Eeg is a real jazz singer. She’s not another Easy Listening vocalist or another singer of standard love songs. She’s not re-singing the great American Songbook. Instead, she rejuvenates and explores her music, searching for new expression and stretching the boundaries of her creativity. That’s really what jazz is all about. She also makes a political statement with her composition, “Aleppo,” musically interpreting a sad song about the strife and genocide in this Syrian city. Her lyric about war and the innocent victims of our human rage for power and greed, paints the picture of a small child trying to survive the ravages of senseless killing. Other favorites are “Time To Go,” and her creative arrangement of “I’ll Remember April”.

Sinne Eeg is the real deal. Here is a project I can wrap my mind around and play over and over again without getting bored or feeling short-changed. Her band is super-supportive and each member, a master musician in their own right. They decorate the stage for Sinne Eeg to perform with brilliance and jazzy improvisation.
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RONDI CHARLESTON – “RESILIENCE”
Resilience Music Alliance

Rondi Charleston, vocals/songwriter; Dave Stryker, guitar/musical director/songwriter; Brandon McCune, piano; Ed Howard, bass; McClenty Hunter, drums; Mayra Casales, percussion. Featured soloists: Tim Ries, tenor saxophone; Alex Norris, flugelhorn.

With the exception of Clifford Brown’s “Joyspring” composition and two other songs, Charleston has co-written all the songs on this album. It’s an interesting collaboration with Musical Director, Dave Stryker. The songs sound pop, but are arranged in a jazzy way. When Charleston tackles “Joyspring” she exhibits her ability to scat and swing. The thing is, when vocalists are freshly learning to improvise, they often think scatting is repeating the melody without singing words. A true scat artist improvises, changing the melody on top of the familiar chord changes. Still, I have to admire Charleston’s ability to spit out all those lyrics at a rapid rate, with good pitch and she swings hard. “Joyspring” is no easy composition to sing.

Her song, “Scrapbook” sounds more like a jazz tune than the first two songs. “Refugee” is produced as a jazz waltz and describes a female character feeling like an outcast, but still striving against all odds to compete and achieve, in spite of being different in a judgmental society. Charleston uses her composition skills to attack social issues with competent and well-written lyrics. This should not be surprising since Rondi Charleston is an award-winning journalist turned jazz singer. She has won both an Emmy and a Peabody Award as a field producer for ABC’s Diane Sawyer. Charleston has a background in acting and sang opera at Julliard before entering the world of investigative journalism. With this album project, she is living out a long-time dream to be a musical poet and jazz singer. The band is ‘kickin’ and totally supportive of her dreams. Tim Ries on tenor saxophone is smokin’ hot on the Eli Yamin tune titled, “A Healing Song.” Dave Stryker has done a great job of co-producing this compact disc with Charleston. However, this artist has a way to go in order to find her musical sweet spot and to develop her vocal jazz style. This is certainly a good start.


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CAROL ROMAN – “GOING HOME; SONGS OF COMFORT”
Dove Street Music

Carol Roman, composer/pianist/arranger; Michael Higgins, guitarist; Charles Holt, Clydene Jackson, Leslie Lewis, Tina Meeks, Margaret Owens, Nadine Risha & Shantih Haast guest vocalists; Richard Jennings, flute/soprano saxophone.

I’ve known Carol Roman for several years, but I never knew about her talents as a pianist and songwriter. She was coming to jazz shows and that’s how we met, both being jazz aficionados. So, when she shyly handed me her latest CD, I was surprised. The music on this CD is in memoriam of several people dear to Ms. Roman, as well as the victims of the 9/11 tragedy in NYC. It’s easy listening, classically flavored music that is simply produced. The composition quality, I found beautiful and peaceful. Featuring mostly Carol Roman’s talents on piano, the first instrumental tune also includes the complimentary flute licks of Richard Jennings. Ms. Roman has composed all the music except track six, written by Shantih Haast. She has also written most of the lyrics. Clydene Jackson interprets vocally on “A Time Gone By,” a song that celebrates the strength of the human spirit, living, loving and praying for peace, while protecting freedom. Ms. Roman has utilized a large group of guest artists from Los Angeles’ talented singer’s pool, to interpret her original songs, with much success. Michael Higgins adds guitar to the mix on “Bud’s Song.” Amy Jahn was the lyricist for this original composition by Carol Roman. Nadine Risha’s lovely vocals are featured. I was surprised to see that Leslie Lewis is also one of the voices who is singing on this album of Roman’s original music. Surprised because I also had received a new album from Ms. Lewis to review. Carol Roman is not jazz. It’s easy listening and features several angel voices who sing tribute songs to the dearly departed, making for an unusual and touching topic of inspiration.


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NEOTOLIA – NAZAN NIHAL & UTAR ARTUN – “NEOTOLIA SONG”
Interrobang Records

Nazan Nihal, vocals/lyricist/composer; Utar Artun, composer/pianist/arranger; Jussi Reijonan & David Fluczynski , fretless electric guitar; Bruno Raberg, acoustic bass; Bassam Saba, ney; Tahi Aydogdu, Qanun; Arto Tuncboyacryan, vocals/percussion; Dave Wecki, drum; Yazhi Guo, dizi; Bruno Raberg, acoustic bass; Jussi Reijonen, guitar/oud; Giuseppe Paradiso, Drums & percussion; Galen G. Willett, Elec bass; Tao He, Erhu; Joey Blake, vocals; Naseem Alatrash, cello; Layth Sidiq, violin.

It was unique listening to this album, because it is sung in an unfamiliar language. For that occurrence, this reviewer had to peel her ears to the melodic structure, the production, the captured emotion of foreign vocalists, and then I read the translated words of the lyrics in the liner notes. Nazan Nihal is a stunning lyricist who is reaching out to the world with words asking us to make a change for the betterment of humanity. The first song is titled “Once Upon A Life.” It has a very haunting melody and the production is ethereal, making me see heavenly constellations and a sky full of sparkling stars as I listen. Nihal’s soprano voice soars operatically, then settles smoothly into her chest register as she sings, “Souls wither in time unless watered by love.” This “Once Upon A Life” composition touches my heart.

“Song of the Monastery” sounds like a pop song. I learn that it’s a traditional Turkish Folk song and it’s the story of a pond and fountain, located in the middle of a monastery where young girls dance and play music.

“Neotolia” is an international band of diverse and skilled musicians, under the leadership of pianist/ composer, Utar Artun, and singer/songwriter Nazan Nihal. They are Turkish and this music is steeped in the rich culture of Eastern Europe, Western Asia and the Mediterranean. Much of it reminds me of the prayers I heard during my travels to Turkey, Palestine and Dubai. This is not jazz. However, I did hear a very fluid scat part performed perfectly by Joey Blake on “Rondo Afro Turea,” another original composition by Utar Artun.

Here is a production that is basically World Music and I decided to review it because these musicians are using music to dissolve prejudice and hierarchies across the board, using both lyrics and their musical arrangements to combine cultures.

If you are looking for something musically unique, you will find it here.
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CORINA BARTRA – “TAKUNDE”
Blue Spiral Music

Corina Bartra, vocals; Steve Sandberg, piano; Victor Murillo, bass; Jay Rodriguez, saxophone; Seth Johnson, guitar; Perico Diaz, cajon; Vince Cherico, drums.

I have one more World Music project that I feel compelled to mention. It features the rich, rhythmic vocals of Corina Bartra who blends the music of Peru, Brazil and Cuba on this new production. Bartra is categorized as a jazz/World Music artist. I hear lots of Afro-Cuban influence in her vocals and once again, I am left to ‘feel’ the music and connect with the emotional production, since I cannot understand her language on many of her lyrics. This is happy music. Music that makes you want to move, dance and hum along with the melodies. Corina Bartra is a human bird whose phrasing and vocal gymnastics explore her wonderful vocal range and presentation. On her original composition, “Ecstasy Green” she shows off her minor chordal tones and lets her soprano notes dance atop the music, like flags waving in the breeze. This is followed by her rendition of “Bridge Over Trouble Waters” sung in English, but colored by unexpected inflections of a foreign language and her unusual tonal style. There is something cat-like about the way she purrs and whines her way through these lyrics. Shades of Eartha Kitt creep from her vocal style and I am reminded of this great American Jazz vocalist and actress by Ms. Bartra’s vocals. Jay Rodriguez adds his screaming saxophone to this song, quite appropriately. “El Guaranguito” is joyful music. It’s noted as an Afro-Peruvian traditional composition on the album cover. This is followed by a Jobim composition, “Samba de Aviao” that switches and sways off the compact disc, like the well-built hips of a well-endowed mambo dancer.

Bartra has composed six of the twelve songs on this CD. Her compositions stretch her vocals to their limits and she inspires her energetic band to pop like rubberbands. They snap with rhythm and enthusiasm. She takes chances with vocal acrobatics, sliding to the notes and using staccato to punch lines and melodies. She has a bigger range than the late Abbey Lincoln, but there are moments when her tone is similar to this iconic American jazz singer. Sometimes I found brief seconds of pitchiness, that interrupted my enjoyment, like stepping bare-footed on a hot stone. But Most importantly, Bartra embraces the element that has made jazz so popular across the globe; improvisation! She boasts degrees in jazz percussion and a Master’s degree in vocal performance from Queens College.

This is my first time hearing an Afro-Peruvian jazz singer/songwriter, who combines Criolla music with jazz. It was an excursion into the unknown that was pleasantly surprising.
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LESLIE LEWIS – “FRAGILE”
Surf Cove Jazz

Leslie Lewis, vocals; Gerard Hagen, piano; Peter Giron, bass; Mourad Benbammou, drums.

From the first rich tones of this astoundingly provocative singer, I am corralled by the emotion she exudes and her unique tonal style. Leslie Lewis’ band and arrangements propel this singer into the realm of memorable inspiration. For example, on the Beatles “Come Together” hit song, they have transformed this pop hit into a very acceptable jazz standard. All the arrangements are attributed to the talents of Leslie’s gifted husband, pianist, Gerard Hagen. Together, this Orange County, California couple relocated to Paris in 2012, where their plates became full of French bread, fine wine and gigs.

The title tune, “Fragile,” reminds us that violence and war threaten the delicate balance of humanity and the earth itself. “Hallelujah” is recorded with a blues/waltz feel and sung quite powerfully by Lewis. She has the kind of power-house voice that could mesmerize audiences from a Broadway stage. “Feeling Good” has a more jazzy sound, as her voice sparkles above Mourad Benbammou’s drums during the initial introductive prelude.

One of my favorite cuts on this recording is “That’s The Way I’ve Always Heard It Should Be,” a song that brings back memories of the early seventies when Carley Simon’s voice was all over the pop radio stations that were playing her music. But Ms. Lewis is no pop singer. She is jazz through and through. I have seen her perform in person, and she also exudes that “It” factor that no one can explain. She knows how to mesmerize a crowd. In the same breath, that gift is often difficult to capture in the recording booth. It is often something you need to be present to experience.

Lewis’ interpretation of Cindy Lauper’s “Time After Time” is done as a Smooth Jazz funk arrangement. Finally, “I Can’t Stand the Rain” finalizes the album with one of Gerard Hagen’s unusually creative arrangements. This R&B hit record by Ann Peoples has been transformed into a funk-jazz production and it works!

“Fragile” is the 5th recording by Leslie Lewis on the Surf Cove Jazz label. In total, this couple (Hagen & Lewis) has recorded eight compact discs that are being distributed and played all over the United States, Asia and Europe. Ms. Lewis has also performed as featured vocalist with the Cleveland Jazz Orchestra, the Pacific Symphony, the Jazz Tap Ensemble and has performed with members of the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Gerard Hagen is an active performer and when not recording, producing, arranging or playing piano for Leslie Lewis, he can be found at the International Music Educators of Paris College of Music, where he currently teaches.


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Tribute to Jazz Masters and Other Sheroes & Heroes

October 7, 2017

TRIBUTE TO JAZZ MASTERS AND OTHER SHEROES & HEROES
CD reviews by Jazz/Journalist, Dee Dee McNeil

October 6, 2017

NESTOR TORRES – “JAZZ FLUTE TRADITIONS”
ALFI RECORDS

Nestor Torres, flute; Silvano Monasterios, piano; Jamie Ousley, bass; Michael Piolet, drums; Jose Gregorio Hernandez, percussion. SPECIAL GUESTS: WDNA SCHOLARSHIP Recipients: Miguel Russell, percussion; Ian Munoz, alto saxophone; Marcus Grant, drums (on ‘Cute’).

Silvano Monasterios opens this CD with some ‘down-home-blues’ piano playing. When Nestor Torres enters on his flute, he reminds me of a Herbie Mann album I used to listen to as a teenager. “Swingin’ Shepherds Blues” brought back wonderful memories of learning about jazz and listening to a jazzy flute during my high school years. “Memphis Underground” is the second cut on this recording, and it spews happiness. This song features scholarship recipient, Miguel Russell on percussion and it swings hard in a very Latin inspired way. Also, the young alto sax player is Ian Munoz, who offers an appealing solo performance. On the fade of this tune, Torres inspires the younger players to get ‘free’ and to express themselves during an improvisational spotlight. They shine! Every tune on this up-beat production is draped in energy and flavored with Caribbean rhythmic excitement, creating musical wonder. Torres reached into the lovely “Spain” composition to slow the production down briefly, before flying full force and energetically into the popular Chick Corea composition. The arrangement is well played technically and challenging. Once again, pianist Monasterios is dynamic and impressive on the keys. Every carefully picked jazz song is played with the utmost care and consideration. You will hear the work of Yusef Lateef, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Eric Dolphy, Neal Hefti’s “Cute”, (that features young Marcus Grant on drums), and even some Cole Porter tunes. I enjoyed every single cut on this compact disc. Nestor Torres brings out the best of his ensemble and is thoroughly inspirational on flute, propelling the music forward like a wizard with a silvery, magic wand. The music is captivating. This eleven-song recording is meant to be a homage to early flute masters like Frank Wess and Moe Koffman, as well as legendary modern flautists like Hubert Laws, Herbie Mann and Yusef Lateef. Well done!

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JOHN BEASLEY – “MONK’ESTRA – VOLUME 2
Mack Ave Records

John Beasley,piano/synthesizer/conductor/arranger; Ben Shepherd, acoustic/ electric bass; terreon Gully & Gene Coye, drums; TRUMPETS: Bijon Watson, Jamie Hovorka, Jmaes Ford, Brian Swartz, Brandyn Philips. TROMBONES: Francisco Torres, Wendell Kelly, Ryan Dragon, Steve Hughes, Ido Meshulam. WOODWINDS: Bob Sheppard, Danny Janklow, Tom Luer, Thomas Peterson, Adam Schroeder, Alex Budman. SPECIAL GUESTS: Conrad Herwig (trombone); Kamasi Washington, tenor saxophone; Pedrito Martinez, (percussion); Dianne Reeves, (vocals); Regina Carter, (violin); and Dontae Winslow, (trumpet/spoken word).

September of 2017 issued in a slew of new music to treasure and enjoy. Among them was John Beasley’s recent release. He is a master musician, pianist/arranger/conductor and this is his second escapade with big band arrangements that celebrate Thelonious Monk. The first tune, “Brake’s Sake,” is full of powerful funk and hip hop. It features the rhymes of Dontae Winslow and the trumpet mastery of the same young man. I am reminded of Quincy Jones on this arrangement. Some years back, Quincy like Beasley, incorporated modern music with old-school jazz sensibilities. This song bring back memories of the seventies and eighties, when I remember how Quincy used the poetry of the Watts Prophets, featuring Otis Smith-O’Solomon’s poem, “Beautiful Black Girl” on his album titled, “Mellow Madness.”

Speaking of “Q”, he has written in Beasley’s CD liner notes, “Thelonius Monk was one of a kind, and so is John Beasley. He hears things in Monk’s music that no one imagined. And he can make an orchestra sing like an uncaged bird.”

That pretty much sums up this entire album.

Beasley has a way of reinventing Monk’s music, while staying true to the composer’s original concepts and melodies. He incorporates a host of impressive guest artists on this Volume Two “Monk’estra” project. You will hear the jazz violin of Detroiter, Regina Carter; the Avant Garde, fluidity of tenor saxophonist, Kamasi Washington; the vocal prowess of Diane Reeves, along with the percussive brilliance of Pedrito Martinez. Another featured, young, up-and-coming reedman is Danny Janklow, solid on alto saxophone. Conrad Herwig is a special guest on trombone.

The Thelonious Monk compositions are well chosen and for the most part, familiar. I enjoyed being re-introduced to “Brake’s Sake”, “Played Twice,” “Light Blue” and “Work.” All you Monk lovers will be thoroughly entertained.

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JANE IRA BLOOM – “WILD LINES: IMPROVISING EMILY DICKINSON”
Outline Records

Jane Ira Bloom, soprano saxophone; Dawn Clement, piano; Mark Helias, bass; Bobby Previte, drums; Deborah Rush, voice.

It seems more and more that artists are melding their instruments with other art forms in order to express a multi-artistic platform for their music. Jane Ira Bloom has embraced the writing talents of visionary poet, Emily Dickinson and created a 2-pack CD of innovative soprano saxophone compositions for her jazz quartet to interpret.

Winner of the 2017 Downbeat Critics Poll for Soprano Sax, Bloom is always challenging herself to re-imagine her musical goals. I learned, from Bloom’s liner notes, that Emily Dickinson was a pianist and improviser herself. Using fragments from Dickinson’s poetic works, Bloom has composed pieces that celebrate words like: “I felt a cleaving in my mind – as if my brain had split – I tried to match it – seam by seam, but could not make them fit.”

Jane Ira Bloom makes the music fit the prose. She has been sharing her soprano saxophone talents with the world for four decades and has won several awards for her always unique body of music, including being a ten-time winner of the Jazz Journalists Association Award for soprano sax and the Charlie Parker Award for Jazz Innovation. She’s won too many awards to list them all here, but a few others are the Guggenheim Fellowship in Music Composition and the Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Award for Lifetime Service to Jazz. Jane Ira Bloom was the first musician commissioned by the NASA Art Program and was honored to have an asteroid named in her honor by the International Astronomical Union. This CD is another example of her musical innovation and brilliance.

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THE CHEAP 3NSEMBLE – PATRICK ARTHUR, DANA FITZSIMONS, CHRIS OTTS
Independent Label

Dana Fitzsimons, drums; Chris Otts, tenor saxophone; Patrick Arthur, guitar.

Here is a Jazz ensemble, featuring Atlanta-based drummer, Dana Fitzsimons. He’s in musical partnership with two other Atlanta jazz musicians; Chris Otts on tenor saxophone and Patrick Arthur on guitar. Otts recently received his Master’s degree in Jazz Studies and has his own debut album titled, “Layers”. Arthur just finished his degree in Jazz Performance and has his own performance group called, “Grut”. Fitzsimons reflects the least amount of performance skills, because he has been busy being a successful attorney dealing with trusts and estates, with a Juris Doctor degree from William and Mary Law School. However, he has a degree from Ithaca College in music, and has always longed to record an album. Surrounded by excellence, this is his premier attempt.

It’s an unusual blend of instrumentation, eliminating the expected piano, bass and drums trio and using instead, drums, guitar and saxophone. The challenge with this combination of musical instruments, is that you have to pursue prominent solos, unusual arrangements and exceptional musicianship to pull it off. This project disappoints with lack luster energy. Although Chris Otts is an award-winning performer/composer and arranger, He cannot save this easy-listening and somewhat Avant Garde concept.

According to the liner notes, Fitzsimons wanted to move away from the ‘Swing’ tradition and eliminate the need to lock in the time with a bass player. Instead, he has chosen sustained sounds and less rhythm to interpret familiar songs like “Poor Butterfly” and “Pure Imagination”. They tackle Chick Corea’s “Matrix” composition and Bruce Hornsby’s “Fortunate Son”. The Hornsby composition was included to celebrate, Williamsburg, Virginia where Fitzsimons lived, studied drums, law and raised two children. This is meditative music, but nothing to pop your fingers to or make you want to dance or paint or write. I found it repetitive and very low energy.

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JACKIE ALLEN – “ROSE FINGERED DAWN”
Avant Bass

Jackie Allen, vocals; Hans Sturm, composer/bass/producer; John Moulder, guitars; Tom Larson, keyboards; Dane Richeson, drums/percussion; Geoff Bradfield, soprano & tenor saxophone/bass clarinet; Victor Garcia, trumpet; Andy Baker, trombone.

This album opens with what sounds like poetry and prayer . Here is a project with an unusual blend of song choices and spoken word. The liner notes describe this first cut as a Ghanian Islamic chant of welcome. It features drummer, Dane Richeson. The music floats from a Flamingo sounding guitar to a big band sounding blues. After the spoken words, (that hints at spells and Voodoo secrets) arrives this old-school arrangement, heralding rhythm and blues with a jazzy New Orleans horn section punching lines in the background. There is a soulful organ solo by Tom Larson on keyboard. Obviously, these artists and this collection of songs, shun categorization.

This is a conglomerate of original compositions, composed by bassist/producer, Hans Sturm. Allen and Sturm are musical partners, as well as husband and wife. They’ve been performing together since the early 1980s. Back then, they were a voice and bass duo act. Sometimes the music is pop/folksy. On tunes like “The Laugh That is You” the group swings in a jazzy way. “Moon’s On the Rise” exhibits more of a Latin production theme, in a smooth jazz sort-of-way. John Moulder is nicely spotlighted on guitar.

Jackie Allen puts her heart and soul into this music, be it blues, swing or ballad. Here is an art adventure, not necessarily restricted to jazz. Instead, it seems musically open-ended. However, meter-wise and as a published songwriter myself, I sometimes had difficulty making the lyrics fit the rhythm of the melodic line. I realize that it’s a matter of artistic taste. Despite this critique, the compositions shine with beautiful and quite poetic lyrics by Sturm. Those lyrics are printed on the CD insert, so you can read the prose along with Jackie Allen’s sincere interpretations.

This CD has been five years in the making and I would have to say, it’s uncategorical art.

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ROB SCHNEIDERMAN – “TONE TWISTER”
Hollistic MusicWorks

Rob Schneiderman, piano; Brian Lynch, trumpet; Ralph Moore, tenor Saxophone; Gerald Cannon, bass; Pete Van Nostrand, drums.

Here is a CD full of compositional diversity. Schneiderman is a prolific songwriter and presents a variety of arrangements that range from Smooth Jazz Funk on “Left Coast Lullaby” to the Latin fused “Footloose Freestyle”. He offers mellow ballads like the standard, “Unforgettable,” to “Distant Memory,” a Straight Ahead composition where Schneiderman stretches his fingers across the keys like a restless butterfly. His arpeggio runs and bright solo work stimulate this project.
I believe I may have witnessed Schneiderman working with Charles McPherson in the early 1980’s when I was often in San Diego enjoying the jazz scene. “Slap Dance-Tap Stick” is very Thelonious- Monk-sounding. The liner notes describe this work’s harmonic structure as based loosely on “I Got Rhythm.” Another composition, “Windblown,” is a melodic waltz. The amazing talents of Brian Lynch on trumpet and Ralph Moore on saxophone certainly add spark and creativity with their horn lines and individual solos on this tune and throughout the album. Schneiderman’s choice of band members is superb and each brings their genius into play on this project. All eight of Schneiderman’s original compositions are works of art that are brought alive by these competent players. I was particularly taken by “The Lion’s Tale” that ends this album.

As someone who has worked with some of the most iconic jazz players of our time, including Eddie Harris, James Moody, J.J. Johnson, Clifford Jordan, Art Farmer and the TanaReid quintet co-led by drummer Akira Tana and bassist Rufus Reid, you will hear this seasoned veteran reflect his many influences in both his compositions and piano style. Every cut on this production is wonderfully arranged and celebrated by Schneiderman and his star-studded band. This is the kind of jazz album that never grows old.

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