Posts Tagged ‘Tierney Sutton’

VARIOUS & SUNDRY JAZZ VOICES

April 25, 2022

By Dee Dee McNeil

April 25, 2022

CHICAGO SOUL JAZZ COLLECTIVE MEETS DEE ALEXANDER – “ON THE WAY TO BE FREE” – JMARQ Records

Dee Alexander, lead vocals; Keith Brooks II, drums; Larry Brown Jr., guitar/vocals; Marques Carroll, trumpet; Amr Fahmy, Fender Rhodes/Elec. piano/clarinet/organ; John Fournier, tenor saxophone/composer; Victor Garcia, percussion; Dan Leali, tambourine; Andrew Vogt, bass.

If you are a lover of punch-driven, Tower-of-Power type horn harmonics and Earth Wind & Fire music, some of this album by the Chicago Soul Jazz Collective is reminiscent of that musical era.  Tenor saxophonist, John Fournier has composed eight of the songs out of the nine offered.  The musicians do an excellent job of interpreting this original material and Dee Alexander is a powerful lead vocalist.  They open with “Mama Are we There Yet?” which is quite reminiscent of the original Chicago based group, Earth Wind & Fire, featuring unison ensemble singing and funky horn lines with Keith Brooks II clearly slapping the rhythm into place.  Ms. Alexander is the lead singer on their title tune, “On the Way to be Free” arranged at a moderate swing pace.  John Fournier plays a tenor saxophone solo that puts the “J” in jazz as he floats above the funky rhythm track. Marquis Carroll offers a complimentary improvised solo on a tune called “Carry Me” and Larry Brown Jr. shows off his mad guitar skills.  The percussion of Victor Garcia peppers this tune with spicy licks.  “Behind the Crusaders” is a toe-tapping instrumental persuasion that moves and grooves.  The final tune spotlights the beautiful bass work of Andrew Vogt who opens the piece.  This is another instrumental that has a catchy horn line and gives a nod to Mr. Brooks II on drums with an energetic, featured solo by Arm Fahmy on electric piano.  The Chicago Soul Jazz Collective is a very soulful band that blends R&B, funk and jazz into a contemporary mix of excitement that’s interpreted by solid jazz players.

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SUSIE BLUE & THE LONESOME FELLAS – “BLUE TRAIN” – Seraphic Records

Solitaire Miles, lead vocals; Tom Hope, piano; Don Stille, Hammond organ; Paul Abella, cajon; Phil Gratteau, drums/percussion; Chris Bernhardt, bass; Neal Alger, guitar; Jack Galagher, trombone; Eric Schneider, saxophone; Howard Levy, harmonica; Dominic Halpin, guest vocalist; Jen Zias, Saalik Ziyad & Mike Harvey, background vocals.

This album of music is a throwback to the bands of the 1950s and 1960s.  It reminds me of the Rock and Roll shows presented in theaters with live bands like Sam the Man Taylor.  Solitaire Miles fronts the Lonesome Fellas with her pleasant voice and spicey attitude.  On “Lucky Lips” the band swings and Neal Alger shines on his guitar solo.  Solitaire Miles celebrates the music of Ruth Brown, re-arranging some of those 1950 hit records and presenting them with her own style and interpretation.   On “Forever Yours” Solitaire is joined by guest vocalist, Dominic Halpin.  After their duet, Howard Levy steps forward with a smart harmonica solo. This song is arranged more like a Country Western tune.  This group reminds me of roadside bars with local, crowd-pleasing entertainment and people two-stepping on sawdust covered floors.  Susie Blue & the Lonesome Fellas is a combination of early Rock and Roll, blues and a sprinkling of jazz. The band rearranges an old rockabilly tune called “She’ll Be Gone” and Solitaire refreshes it nicely with her adaptable vocals.  They shuffle their way through “Give Up That Honey” and the band encourages you to get up and swing dance your way through this energy-driven, up-tempo tune.  This album is just plain fun!  The song repertoire offers catchy lyrics, background voices that know how to punch the tune titles and a band that swings hard.

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MARK WINKLER – “LATE BLOOMIN’ JAZZMAN” – Café Pacific Records

Mark Winkler, vocals/composer/lyricist; David Benoit, Rich Eames, Jamieson Trotter & Jon Mayer, piano/composers/arrangers; Gabe Davis, bass; John Clayton, bass/arranger; Cameron Clayton & Christian Euman, drums; Kevin Winard, percussion. Grant Geissman, guitar; Bob Sheppard, flute/saxophone; Brian Swartz, trumpet; Nolan Shaheed, flugelhorn.

Mark Winkler has a way of carefully and deliberately picking a repertoire that suits his style and musicians that embellish his arrangements with their excellence.  Winkler may be a “Late Bloomin’ Jazzman” (whose voice sometimes reminds me of the ‘Rat Pack” days and Dean Martin) but he always brings sincerity and creativity to his projects.  He shares a rollicking, swing arrangement of the Michael Franks tune, “Don’t Be Blue.”  His arrangement will lift the spirits.  Mark is also a talented lyricist and songwriter.  I always look forward to his original compositions.  On this project he has included eight originals out of twelve songs and each one glitters with their own lyrical brilliance. “When All the Lights in the Sign Worked” is a perfect example of Winkler’s creative lyricism written to Joe Pasquale’s beautiful minor melody.  The trumpet of Brian Swartz is a welcome addition to the arrangement and Bob Sheppard’s saxophone embellishes the film noir, poignant story.

“It’s a rainy night on Western, cars are driving much too fast; neon coloring the raindrops, running down the windshield glass.  And the buildings all have fire escapes, but no one’s escaping from here.  Boarded up store fronts and the harms of another year.  …  I keep wondering what it must have been like, when all the lights in the sign worked on a long-gone Hollywood night.”

Gabe Davis opens the title tune with his double bass and provides a background groove for Mark Winkler as he strides into the spotlight, using spoken word to introduce himself.  This song reflects his love of theater and showmanship.  “In Another Way” is a tribute to his lost love.  The Latin inspired “Bossa Nova Days,” penned with Bill Cantos, is one of my favorites.  There is a theme in this album; a theme of aging, maturity and the wiseness that comes from living a full and appreciated life.  Songs like “Before You Leave” remind us of love’s magnet and life’s preciousness.  His tune “Old Enough” reviews a singer, songwriter’s life and the ignorance of youth that eventually teaches us well-lived lessons.  His lyrics on “Marlena’s Memories” is a tribute to his friend who is suffering with Alzheimer disease.  Nolan Shaheed adds a lovely flugelhorn touch to the tune and Jamieson Trotter’s emotional piano solo tells his own tender tale.  Trotter is also the co-writer of this composition.  As a published songwriter myself, I have great admiration and appreciation for Mark Winkler’s songwriting talents, his thought-provoking lyrics; his heartfelt performances and his passionate love of jazz.

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LADY COCO – “BESIDE MYSELF” – Independent Label

Lady Coco, vocals/songwriter/arranger; Chris Wilson, keyboards; Blake Morris, guitar; Aaron Mason, bass; Lance Lee, drums; Buddy McDaniel, saxophone; Kim Thomas & Charlotte Pope, background vocals; Preston Glass, producer/arranger/composer/piano. SPECIAL GUESTS: Rob Mullins, piano; Munyungo Jackson, percussion; Tomoka Nomura-Jarvis, flute; Larry Antonino, electric bass; Cal Rutherford, horns. Will Downing, background vocals; Eric Roberson, duet vocal on “How Could We Know?”

Lady Coco, in coordination with producer Preston Glass, has come up with a very pleasing new CD.  Opening with a catchy tune titled, “Jazz Junkie,” Lady Coco captivates with her crystal clear, soprano vocals and the repeatable ‘hook’ of the song.  She will have you singing along!  “Shoo be doo ya do – do ya – do ya.  Call me a jazz junkie, vibing to the beat.”   Her voice is honest, fun-loving and persuasive.  Lady Coco and producer, Preston Glass collaborated on this song and penned six others on this production.  Rob Mullins appears as a special guest playing a notable piano solo during this opening arrangement.  Lady Coco and Eric Roberson duet on another tune she co-wrote with producer Glass. It’s titled, “How Could We Know?”  Eric Roberson’s voice is a beautiful addition to this R&B mix and Blake Morris is dynamic on electric guitar.  Lady Coco’s project offers a blend of contemporary jazz, blues and pop music.  In the past, I was familiar with the blues-ier side of Lady Coco.  On this recording, she has expanded her talents to expose her composing skills and to explore more versatility in her music.  For example, when she performs the jazz standard, “Mister Magic.”  The band arrangement puts a funk groove into place on this one and spotlights Chris Wilson, who boldly tosses his jazzy saxophone into the mix.  They close this production with another original, “Stay in Your Lane.”  This jazzy arrangement is produced with a very danceable, disco-type groove.  It’s another Glass and Lady Coco composition and a joyful way to end this musical experience.

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JACKIE MESSINA – “NECESSARY ARRANGEMENTS” – JM Records

Jackie Messina, vocals; Bruce Barth, piano; Will Galison, harmonica; Paul Beaudry & Ed Howard, bass; Cliff Barbara, drums.

“Necessary Arrangements” is an album by vocalist Jackie Messina to tribute her musical collaboration with the late jazz pianist and educator Enos Payne.  Payne was the former conductor of the Jazz Vocal Workshop at the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music and this album features unique arrangements from Messina’s five-year musical relationship with her mentor.  The addition of harmonica to her stellar jazz group is a beautiful touch on Messina’s debut album.  Will Galison’s harmonica adds excitement and expression to Jackie Messina’s interpretation of the Frank Loesser tune, “Inchworm.” 

“I Feel Pretty,” the hit song from the Broadway musical “West Side Story” was arranged by the late Enos Payne as a slow swing, rather than the waltz that had Natalie Wood prancing across the screen in the 1961 film of this show-stopper.  Payne’s arrangement compliments Jackie Messina’s voice and delivery.  Messina delves into the blues on “Easy Street” and swings the familiar “Wild is the Wind” with a catchy piano line created by Enos Payne that drives the piece.  Bruce Barth takes a powerful piano solo.    As a Former published poet, Jackie Messina has a great love of lyrics.  You can see this expressed in the Baker’s Dozen’ of tunes that make up her repertoire.  Jackie includes gems like Bobby Hutcherson’s “Little B’s Poem” and the Sinatra recorded lyrics of “I’m a Fool to Want You.”  I can tell that Ms. Messina takes a hard look at the lyrics of each song she performs; songs that lyrically touch her heart and soul. 

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ANDY JAMES – “RHYTHM IN NEW YORK” – Le Coq Records

Andy James, vocals/composer; Jon Cowherd, piano/organ/arranger; John Patitucci, bass/arranger; Nate Smith & Marcus Gilmore, drums; Marcus Strickland & Chris Potter, saxophone; Adam Rogers, guitar; Alex Acuna & Rogerio Boccato, percussion; David Mann, flute/alto flute; Chico Pinheiro, nylon guitar; Terell Stafford, trumpet; Marshall Gilkes, trombone; NYC Strings.

Andy James is back with another interpretation of fifteen jazz and pop standards; surrounded by some of the finest jazz musicians in the music business.  On the opening tune, “I’m Gonna Live ‘til I Die” the spotlight shines brightly on drummer Nate Smith.  On track #2, they move from swing to strings.  Chris Potter steps forward to woo us with his saxophone solo, introducing an arrangement by John Patitucci of a song penned by Andy James and Griesun Patitucci titled, “Day Dream.”  I was expecting the Billy Strayhorn tune, but this is another lovely ballad.  Ms. James has chosen a scattering of pop songs to include in this album.  There’s “Walk on By” and “What the World Needs Now” by Burt Bacharach, with arrangements by her pianist, Jon Cowherd.  However, what happened to the chord changes on the popular “People” song?  Something went askew on that arrangement.

Andy James and her husband, owner of the Le Coq Record label, have collaborated as songwriters for this project. Piero Pata and Andy have contributed original songs, “Time to Think” and “Just in Time” for this album.

“Working with Piero has really been easy,” Andy James says of their songwriting experience.  “Wherever I am, he seems to catch and remember the melodies that I’ve been casually humming around the house and later brings them to me with lyrics already attached.”

Andy James has a distinctive tone that makes her a very recognizable jazz stylist.  She and John Patitucci perform a duet on “I’ll Be Seeing You” that is quite poignant and emotional.  After the first time down, the band enters to fatten the sound. The duet blend was striking and impressive with its own stand-alone beauty.  The band closes with an original song Andy and her husband composed that ‘swings’ brightly and features Chris Potter’s saxophone and Marcus Gilmore displaying strength and excitement on drums.

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MAFALDA MINNOZZI – “CINEMA CITY JAZZ SCENE FROM ITALIAN FILM” – MPI Records

Mafalda Minnozzi, vocals; Tiago Costa, piano; Sidiel Vieira, acoustic bass; Ricardo Mosca, drums; Paul Ricci, guitars/musical director; Art Hirahara, organ; Dave Liebman, soprano saxophone; Graham Haynes, cornet/electronic FX; Luca Aquino, flugelhorn; Jorginho Neto, trombone.

Vocalist Mafalda Minnozzi celebrates film scores, carefully chosen to represent scenes from the peaks and valleys of her own personal life.   Opening with “La Dolce Vita,” her soprano tones blend instrumentally, performing without words and often sounding like a trumpet rather than a voice.  This music has been plucked from the silver screen and reflect Mafalada Minnozzi’s native Italy.  The distinctive flavor of these compositions is offered by Morricone, Mancini, Cipriani, Coppola and more.  On Mancini and Merrill’s composition, “Loss of Love,” from the Sunflower film, Tiago Costa’s piano solo is inspired and Minnozzi’s voice emotionally colors the lyrics. 

On “Metti Una Sera A Cena” she performs with a hip-swaying Latin rhythm.  It’s a familiar song that she often includes in her Brazilian concerts.  The “Cinema City” album was conceived and recorded in Brazil during the COVID-19 lockdown. 

Deanna Durbin sang the “Amapola” song in the 1939 film First Love. This song was also performed in other films by Alberto Rabagliati (1941) and Sara Montiel (La Bella Lola, 1962).  In Gabrielle Roy ‘s “The Tin Flute,” published in 1945, the character, Emmanuel, hums “Amapola”.  Paul Ricci’s guitar sets the mood on the very beautiful Rustichelli/Longo composition, “Amici Miel.”  This was a 1975 comedy film about four inseparable male friends facing a middle life crisis. Minnozzi sings this song and several others in Italian.  She often incorporates her pure vocal tones into the arrangements.  Her vocals become similar to another horn instrument.  Mafalda Minnozzi’s band does an exquisite and supportive job of interpreting these compositions in a very jazz-driven way.  Some of the Award winning songs were familiar to my ear like “Arrivederci Roma” from the 1957 sound track of the Italian-American musical film with the same title, released as Seven Hills of Rome in English.  I remember Mario Lanza singing this song.  I wish Mafalda Minnozzi had written her own lyrics to some of these songs that have no words and perhaps shared them with us in English, infusing them with her own poetic creativity and life experiences.  This is an album that shows how classically based compositions and pop soundtracks can expertly be delivered into the jazz idiom.

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TIERNEY SUTTON – “PARIS SESSIONS 2” – BFM Jazz

Tierney Sutton, voice/arranger/co-producer; Serge Merlaud, guitars/arranger/co-producer; Kevin Axt, basses/co-producer; Hubert Laws, flutes.

This “Paris Sessions 2” album is scheduled for release on May 6, 2022.  Tierney and her new husband, Serge Merlaud, open this album as a duo, with Jobim’s “Triste” lighting their fire in Latin brilliance.  Tierney Sutton’s voice dances around the tune, improvising with scat whispers.  She sings these lyrics in Portuguese.  Track #2 takes a lyrical turn towards the French roots of Serge Merlaud.  It’s a medley combining the composition of Vernon Duke and Yip Harburg, (“April in Paris”) with Joni Mitchell’s “Free Man in Paris.”  The familiar “April in Paris” is stretched out, arranged as a very slow ballad, giving Tierney Sutton time to taste each poignant lyric from the 1932 Broadway musical, Walk a Little Faster.  It’s a delightful medley with the unexpected Joni Mitchell flavor added like pepper to the slow boiling stew.

“We got married at the end of 2019, had a ceremony in Paris in October and another in L.A. at the end of December,” Sutton recalls.

Their duet work continues on the Gershwin song, “Isn’t It a Pity (we never ever met before).”  These lyrics perhaps mesh with the duo’s corresponding life path.  Serge Merlaud’s guitar-fills are beautifully placed between the lyrical Sutton’s vocal interpretation.  Merlaud is a sensitive and technically astute player. Their entire quartet makes its appearance on Jobim’s tune, “Zingaro” and features Hubert Laws on alto flute.  This is a precious merging of Tierney’s high soprano notes that are warm against the richness of Hubert’s flute. Tierney Sutton offers this fifteenth album release as a leader and she has dedicated it to the memory of the late Marilyn Bergman who passed away in January of 2022.  Bergman’s songs she has included are “Cinema Paradiso/I Knew I Loved You,” an Alan and Marilyn Bergman composition with Ennio Morricone, “Moonlight” which the married songwriters wrote with John Williams and “A Child is Born” where the Bergman’s collaborated with Dave Grusin.  Tierney and Serge are playful on “Pure Imagination,” where their musical comfort with each other continues to be palpable.  Tierney scats her way through Serge Merlaud’s arrangement of “Doralice,” letting her voice double with the guitar.  She lets her voice set the bass line in place and establishes the tempo, before Kevin Axt enters with his own superb bass support.  The solo by Hubert Laws flies through space like a wild and beautiful bird.  Serge Merlaud takes time to showcase his own unique interpretation of this familiar standard during his brief but power-packed guitar solo.  “Paris Sessions 2” is so well-played I didn’t even miss the drums.

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