Posts Tagged ‘Diana Krall’

NEW YEAR! NEW MUSIC FOR 2021

January 2, 2021

By Dee Dee McNeil / Jazz Journalist

January 2, 2021

DIANA KRALL – “THIS DREAM OF YOU” –  Verve Records

Diana Krall, piano/vocals; John Clayton Jr., Tony Garnier & Christian McBride, bass; Jeff Hamilton & Karriem Riggins, drums; Anthony Wilson, Russell Malone & Marc Ribot, guitar; Stuart Duncan, fiddle; Alan Broadbent, piano; Randall Krall, accordion; STRING SECTION: VIOLINS: Charles Bisharat, Mario DeLeon, Kevin Connolly, Neel Hammond, Tamara Hatwan, Natalie Leggett, Songa Lee, Katia Popov, Michele Richards, Kathleen Sloan, Marcy Vaj, Ina Veli & John Wittenberg. VIOLA: Andrew Duckles, Kathryn Reddish, Colleen Sugata & Michael Whitson; CELLO: Jodi Burnett, Alisha Bauer, Jennifer Kuhn & Cello Soloist: Vanessa Freebairn-Smith. CONCERTMASTER: Joel Derouin.

Her husky voice glides across the space like a lovely bird in flight singing, “But Beautiful.”  Diana Krall has a way of inviting you into the story of her song lyrics, as if she’s your best friend, whispering secrets across the table as you both sip drinks.  Her all-star band is complimented by a full string ensemble.  Track two features another sincere delivery on “That’s All” that shows her vulnerability vocally, while showcasing her jazzy piano playing.  On these first two songs her rhythm section is composed of John Clayton jr. on bass, Jeff Hamilton on drums and Anthony Wilson on guitar.  Then comes “Autumn in New York” arranged with Russell Malone on guitar and Christian McBride on bass. The flavor of the rhythm section changes.  During the first part of this tune, Diana Krall steps away from the piano and her voice soars.  Then, the string ensemble joins them.  The guitar solo by Russell Malone is stunning.  On Track 4, “Almost Like Being in Love” the pace picks up a wee bit with a shuffle rhythm.  Jeff Hamilton is back on drums and John Clayton Jr. mans the bass. During this arrangement, Diana Krall’s piano excellence takes the opportunity to stretch out and show-off her technical talents.  On “More Than You Know” Ms. Krall is joined by the iconic Alan Broadbent on piano.  She introduces us to the verse that prefaces this familiar American Standard tune and once again sells the song.  This is an album perfect to play during a romantic evening by a roaring fireplace or cuddling beneath the covers.  On Track 6., “Just You, Just Me” she once again switches up the players.  Now Tony Garnier is on bass, pumping the rhythm and locking in with Karriem Riggins on drums.  Marc Ribot is on guitar and a very country/Western sounding fiddle player named Stuart Duncan is featured.  Drummer Riggins takes stage center during this arrangement and is given ample time to solo and trades fours, displaying his chops.

Diana Krall pays tribute to Nina Simone’s historic song, “Don’t Smoke in Bed” as a duo piece featuring Alan Broadbent on piano.  Another duo she includes on this project is one with bass master, John Clayton Jr., on “I Wished on the Moon,” a straight-ahead piece where both musicians excel at doing what they do best.  The title tune, “This Dream of You,” is very folksy and it’s an odd fit with the jazz theme of this album.  It’s got a pretty melody and would have made a nice jazz waltz arrangement or even a rot-gut blues.  Instead, Krall stepped out of the realms of a jazz album and into a Country/Western, folksy production.  For me, it compromises the theme of this album.  Another disappointment was “How Deep Is the Ocean,” enhanced by mallets on the drums.  The muted rhythm sets a sultry mood, but then, to my surprise, Krall takes liberties with this breathtakingly beautiful melody.  Her arrangement moves so far from the original melody that it really becomes a new tune with the same lyrics. I found this very disappointing, because it destroyed the original beauty of Irving Berlin’s lovely composition.  On the whole, this is an easy listening, well-produced experience, with the exciting assistance of some of the best jazz names in the business, as well as a lovely string ensemble.  Diana Krall’s accomplished piano playing and sultry, singing style are always an entertaining and exploratory experience.

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MIGUEL ZENON AND LUIS PERDOMO – “EL ARTE DEL BOLERO” – Miel Music

Miquel Zenon, alto saxophone; Luis Perdomo, piano.

In September of 2020, during the raging pandemic that took so many innocent lives worldwide, Miguel Zenon picked up his alto saxophone and joined pianist, Luis Perdomo to record a concert at the Jazz Gallery in New York City.  That concert was livestreamed in November and this album release is the result of that amazingly beautiful music played to an empty space, with all the heartfelt emotion that these two iconic musicians could muster.   The song “Como fue” opens this artistic experience.  Their interpretation of this song stopped me in my tracks and made me sit quietly and listen to this entire album.  It was a spellbinding experience.  Track two, titled “Alma Adentro” is another pretty ballad that is caressed and cradled in the bell of Miguel Zenon’s horn.  The piano of Luis Perdomo is equally brilliant, not only adding spice and support during his accompaniment, but additionally expanding on their theme and improvising freely during his solo. 

I found sweet solace in this music.  During a time of such drama and trauma, it was wonderful to hear comfort music that was not only beautifully performed, but also music that offers tranquility and peace.  Miquel’s tone on his alto saxophone is smooth and soothing. He balances contradictory poles of jazz innovation with Latin tradition. Luis Perdomo’s piano playing is rich with emotion.  Every song on this duo production is entertaining and technically astute.  Clearly these are two master musicians.  Settle back in your favorite lounge chair and enjoy.  The digital-only release will be available January 8, 2021.

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HENRY ROBINETT – “JAZZ STANDARDS, VOL. 2: THEN AGAIN” – Nefertiti Records

Henry Robinett, guitar; Joe Gilman, piano; Chris Symer, bass; Michael Stephans, drums.

Henry Robinett has a light, precise touch on his guitar strings.  His bebop style skips along at a brisk pace on their opening number, “Yours Is My Heart Alone.”  It’s a great way to open this album and to introduce us to the players.  Joe Gilman steps into the spotlight with a bright, intriguing piano solo.  Michael Stephans, an extraordinary drummer, keeps the pace solidified and ever-moving.  He ‘trades fours’ with Gilman and Robinett, showing off his technical skills and strength.  Back in 2020, I enjoyed and reviewed the first release of Robinett’s 20-year-old recording project that he called “Jazz Standards, Vol. 1.”  At the time of this recording project, Henry Robinett was working as an engineer at ‘The Hangar’, a recording studio in Sacramento.  The quartet managed to record enough material in two days to create two volumes of exceptional music.  Although Robinett has gone on to make his mark as more of an electric jazz player, when he re-listened to these dynamite tracks, Henry recognized the brilliance and beauty he had overlooked in his younger years. 

“After listening to it again, after so many years, I like it.  I think it stands up well and shows another side to my playing,” Robinett explained in his press package.

Henry Robinett is not only a jazz guitarist, bandleader, composer and artist, but he’s also an educator.  He’s been in love with the guitar since age thirteen.  His diverse and extremely different musical influences were Jimi Hendrix and Charles Mingus, who was his father’s first cousin.  When Robinett isn’t performing, you may find him teaching in Vienna, Austria at the American Institute of Music or on the faculty of the University of the Pacific and Consumnes River College.

As a lover of ‘swing’ and bebop, I am drawn to Henry Robinett’s music like a fish to water.  I find a comfort level swimming in his clearly defined melodies and soaking up his rich improvisations.  The songs this quartet offers are mostly familiar and range from a swinging arrangement of “On the Street Where You Live” to the sexy ballad, “Body and Soul.”  They swing “Like Someone in Love” and shuffle through “Milestones.”  Every tune becomes a favorite and each arrangement is brilliantly highlighted by the gold-plated excellence of these musicians.

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RODERICK HARPER – “EVOLVING” – R. H. M. Entertainment, Inc.

Roderick Harper, vocals; Oscar Rossignoli, piano/percussion; Shea Pierre, Jesse Davis & Ellis Marsalis, piano; Robin Sherman, Roland Guerin & Amina Scott, bass; Chris Guccione, Gerald Watkins, Geoff Clapp & Jamison Ross, drums; Donald Harrison, saxophone; Thomas Dawson, string arrangement; Roderick Paulin, soprano saxophone; John Jones, Fender Rhodes piano.

Vocalist, Roderick Harper Muhammad, opens this album with an original composition titled “Infinite Heart” that he co-wrote with Donald Harrison.  I was unsure about this artist because of all the dissonance I heard on this first song.  Was it intentional?  Was the vocalist off pitch or were the chords strange?  But when I heard him sing, “Never Let Me Go” I had a completely different opinion of Roderick Harper Muhammad. This tune is the only one featuring the iconic Ellis Marsalis.  The Thomas Dawson string arrangement is beautiful as Harper-Muhammad pours his heart out.

When he tackled the Donny Hathaway hit record, “Someday We’ll All Be Free” he continued to make me a believer.  The man can sing.  Performing with only bass and piano, he was vocally strong.  However, I began to wish his piano accompanist had been more of a jazz pianist.  The musicians change on this recording, which also takes away from the continuity of the production and Harper-Muhammad has self-produced his project.  Sometimes an artist needs a producer to sit in the engineering booth and guide them to find the very best of themselves. That being said, the potential and vocal charm of this artist are clearly present.  He is a diamond in the rough.  But like he states in the title of this project, Roderick Harper is ‘Evolving.’ 

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TRIO GRANDE – Whirlwind Recordings

Will Vinson, saxophones/keyboards; Gilad Hekselman, guitars; Antonio Sanchez, drums.

What do you get when you mix Mexican, Israeli and British cultures into a contemporary jazz album?  It’s like a ball of colorful yarn that unravels and spins songs featuring saxophones, guitars, drums and a splattering of keyboards?  The answer is, “Trio Grande.” 

This is their debut statement and features three, inventive musicians who are working the New York music scene.  Will Vinson is British-born and plays saxophones.  Gilad Hekselman is an Israeli guitarist and Antonio Sanchez is a Mexico City native, a drummer who has been living in Queens for quite a while. Each musician is a bandleader of their own unique groups, but they come together on this recording to explore a bass-less situation.  Without a bass to ground the music, they are hoping to share a sort of musical freedom, while interjecting their diverse cultures. 

Each member is a composer.  Drummer, Sanchez composed the opening tune, “Northbound” and track 6, “Gocta,” that has a fluid, ethereal feel to it.   Hekselman’s love of song forms and melody, along with his appreciation of folk music and pop, is reflected in his composition, “Elli Yeled Tov.”  The addition of hand-claps and the isolation of instrumentation, soloing alone at first with only hand-clapping accompaniment, brings a child’s party atmosphere to mind.  I quickly learn the repetitive melody, but I notice that the rhythm patterns are more complicated than the simplistic melodic tones.  Will Vinson has composed “Oberkampf,” a brooding song with streaks of rock music threaded through the electric guitar lines.  It’s very dirge-like.  On the other side of the coin, his original song, “Upside” gives Antonio Sanchez the opportunity to play on the introduction with just his trap drums.  Once Vinson, the saxophonist enters, his composition transforms to a smooth jazz, contemporary-feel.  I found myself drawn to the song, “Firenze” by Sanchez, who takes a very melodic solo on drums. 

This is an interesting blend of cultures and music that, as Will Vinson muses:

“…The album’s magic lies in the way that so many disparate musical elements are woven together to create a coherent whole. … We’re all grounded in jazz, but all of us are also looking for other sounds and influences to bring in.”

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CARLA CAMPOPIANO – “CHICAGO/BUENOS AIRES CONNECTIONS, VOL. 11” – Independent Label

Carla Campopiano, flutes; Gustavo Cortinas, drums/percussion.

Having worked for three major record companies in the past, (United Artists/Bluenote and A&M) I know how important the cover or jacket of an album is to promotion, sales and artist development.  The artwork of Esperanza Gama certainly got my attention, with her multi-colored, decoratively painted hand on the cover of Carla Campopiano’s new CD.  Campopiano is a Chicago artist who has been blending her native Argentinean roots with jazz for several years.  On this recording she uses her flute to introduce us to several Argentine composers, sparsely using only a trio setting to explore these compositions.   It’s very South American folksy, slightly blended with jazz.  This project is dedicated lovingly to their talented vocalist, Alba Guerra, who passed away after the recording was completed. I was especially taken by her emotional delivery and interpretation of “La Pomena.” 

Carla Campopiano is a studied musician who mastered the Latin melodies and rhythms of candombe, chacarera, milonga and the tango.  She also has studied and played Middle Eastern music and found herself working with American heavy metal bands in Chicago.  As an educator, she shares her years of research into the history of tango music on a podcast that promotes Latin American artists showcasing their original music. This project invites listeners to enjoy Carla Campopiano’s warm flute talents and to be introduced to what classical music becomes when culturally combined with tangos, milongas, zambas, Argentinean composers, world music and jazz.

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AARON BURNETT & THE BIG MACHINE – “JUPITER CONJUNCT” – Fresh New Talent Label

Aaron Burnett, tenor saxophone/composer; Adam O’Farrill, trumpet; Joel Ross, vibraphone; Carlos Homs, piano/keyboard; Nick Jozwiak, bass; Kush Abadey, drums; Esperanza Spalding, vocals.

Aaron Burnett’s album title fascinated me, because this year issues in an astrological change that hasn’t happened in twenty years.  When Jupiter and Saturn conjuncted in December, their meeting created a very bright star in the sky.  Some astrologers think that was the north star that led the wise men to baby Jesus many years ago.  On this unusual 2019 Winter Solstice occasion, this conjunction is called a Grand Mutation.  It signals a big change on Earth and for those who believe in astrology, a pathway into the Age of Aquarius.  Aaron Burnett described the album title this way:

“Jupiter Conjunct is a testament to seek and perpetuate the evolution of my consciousness and my admiration of our creator and the connection to the All through sound.”

The group opens with his ballad composition “Color Durations” that is one in nine original pieces Burnett has written for this album.  It’s meditative in feel and sound, using the piano of Carlos Homs as a catalyst that sparkles like stars on a clear night. Track 2, “The Veil,” features the close harmonies of trumpeter Adam O’Farrill and Aaron Burnett on tenor saxophone.  This technique is used throughout the album.  I enjoyed the contrast during the trio performance of the Homs upper register keyboard against the rich bass sounds of Nick Jozwiak. Joel Ross adds vibraphone to the mix and its quite compelling, changing the face of the song, like adding lip gloss to a pretty model’s lovely face.  Once the mood has been set and Aaron Burnett steps into the spotlight on alto saxophone, he flushes out improvised ideas and spews his musical thoughts rigorously.  Burnett’s music is both melodic and Avant-garde.  The vocals of Esperanza Spalding, harmonizing with Burnett’s tenor sax, hooks into my ear like a gold earring.  Spalding’s scat singing enhances the production and introduces us to the melody of “Ganymede,” along with the vibes of Joel Ross, before Burnett takes over to pump the piece up on his horn.  Finally, on track 5, the song “10” races from the disc with energy and gives Kush Abedey, on drums, an opportunity to showcase his chops.  Up until this point, all the music had been pretty ‘laid back’.  I wish Abedey had put some funk into this piece or laid down sixteen or more bars of pure groove, just to lift the arrangement and let me snap my fingers to the two and four.  Sometimes ethereal is over-rated.  Aaron Burnett & the Big Machine offer an opportunity for Burnett to present his original compositions and arrangements to the world.  They repeat the song, “Ganymede” to close this album out as an alternate take.  It is one of the most interesting and charismatic songs on this project, reminding me a lot of the early art of Flora Purim with Airto Moreira. 

According to Jupiter’s conjunct status, in 2021, we are now moving into the realm of new ideas and explorations into technology.  Like the power he uses to blow his horn, we are now moving into an era propelled by the element of air.  I believe Aaron Burnett is growing into his power and talent, evolving with each new gig and every fresh composition. 

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