VOICES PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

By Dee Dee McNeil

August 15, 2022

SAMARA JOY – “CAN’T GET OUT OF THIS MOOD” – Verve Records / a SINGLE RELEASE

Ben Paterson, piano; David Wong, double bass; Kenny Washington, drums.

Here is a young jazz vocalist who embodies Ella Fitzgerald’s smooth style, adding her own succinct and unique vocal qualities to captivate our ears as she sings, “Can’t Get Out of This Mood.”   This Is Samara Joy’s single release from her upcoming album, scheduled for a September 2022 release and titled, “Linger Awhile.”   

Samara Joy is a vocalist to watch.  I am certain she will climb the ladder to fame and fortune and her voice will carry the true jazz vocal torch straight up to the stars.  She is a product of a musical family.  Her grandparents, Elder Goldwire and Ruth McLendon, led the well-known Philadelphia-based gospel group “The Savettes.”  Her father toured with Andrae Crouch.  Consequently, her early musical influences are gospel based, but also include the inspiration from genius artists like Stevie Wonder, Lalah Hathaway, George Duke and Musiq Soulchild.  It wasn’t until she attended Fordham High School for the Arts that she discovered and fell in love with jazz.  She has already won Best Vocalist at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Essentially Ellington competition and recently graduated as the Ella Fitzgerald Scholar.  Let me introduce you to 22-year-old Samara Joy, who gives me hope that jazz is alive and secure in the hands of a new, young, talented generation.

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DO’A – “HIGHER GROUND” – Outside In Music

Do’A, Vocals/guitar/piano/composer; Harold Lopez-Nussa, piano/vocals; Nando Michelin & Syhai Maestro, piano; Julio Cesar Gonzalez, bass; Shango Dely & Ruy Adrian Lopez-Nussa, percussion; Mayquel Gonzalez, trumpet.

Do’A is a vocalist with a haunting voice and a style all her own.  Her music is interesting and unique, blending Brazilian and Columbian cultures with her Albanian upbringing and elements of Albanian folk music. She sprinkles in jazz, samba and African rhythms to tantalize us with her multi-languages and honey-warm voice.  Currently, she is an artist-in-residency at the Music Center of Strathmore in North Bethesda, Maryland.  This project introduces us to Do’A who sings, plays piano, guitar and composes.  I am enamored by her composer talents. As soon as I heard this album, I thought the hit record, the crossover, commercial, original song written by Do’A  is “Lampara.”   Not only do I think “Lampara” is a hit, but I also think “Unidad” is a strong second. Both are sung in Spanish. Her melodies are hypnotic and, although I don’t understand the language, I am still intoxicated with the songs of Do’A.  On her opening song, “Flor de Lis” she sings in Portuguese.  Shai maestro’s piano playing introduces us to an Albanian Folk Song, “Pranvera” along with Do’A’s smooth and intimate vocals in her native language.  It’s my first time hearing Albanian folk music and I find it truly delicious to my ears. On the final song, Do’A sits at the piano to play her original composition called, “Krijim,” also sung in Albanian.  This is world music with an international theme.  She sings in English, Portuguese, Spanish and Albanian to interpret the theme of her album, “Higher Grounds.” Do’A hopes that her music is reflective of the interconnected nature of the human spirit. This is her debut album and it transcends borders, genres and traditions to introduce us to Do’A the artist. Her music also calls attention to the power and to the love that music can transmit. I look forward to hearing, not only her husky, emotional voice in the future, but more Do’A compositions. 

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JOHN MINNOCK – “SIMPLICITY” – Dot Time Records

John Minnock, vocals; Dave Liebman, soprano saxophone; Mathis Picard, piano/composer; Sean Mason, piano; Mark Lewandowski, bass; Pablo Eluchans, drums; Carolos Mena, bass.

There is nothing simple about John Minnock’s “Simplicity” album.  The songs are challenging, with technically difficult melodies, but Minnock sings them easily, fooling the listener into believing they are simple.  His vocal timbre somehow reminds me of Al Jarreau’s tone, although he has a completely different style and presence.  His band is smokin’ hot with master reedman, Dave Liebman, always a joy to hear on saxophone. The arrangements are interesting and for the most part, compliment his creativity. Pianist, Mathis Picard has composed several of these songs with lyricist Erick Holmberg and sometimes John Minnock contributing words. I love their bluesy “Cape’s End” and I’m intrigued with “Bordeaux” a song about a faraway place and a distant love that teases Minnock’s range and has a provocative melody with unusual intervals.  John sings a few standards you will recognize like “Angel Eyes,” “Maiden Voyage” and “You Don’t Know What Love Is.”  On both the Matt Dennis tune and Hancock’s composition, Dave Liebman is given free rein to explore all the nuances of the tunes before John Minnock takes center stage and does his own unique interpretations. On the Herbie Hancock tune, he improvises without lyrics and leaves the soloing to Liebman and Mathis Picard on piano. The voice becomes a human instrument that simply colors the tune at various points.  This is art for art’s sake and since jazz reflects freedom and creativity, this is a perfect example of just that.

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SHEILA JORDAN – LIVE AT MEZZROW – Cellar Music

Sheila Jordan, vocals; Alan Broadbent, piano; Harvey S., bass.

On a cold, wintry, October twenty-fifth evening, the jazz luminary, Sheila Jordan, took to the stage of the intimate Mezzrow Jazz Club. She opens with the Abbey Lincoln composition, “Bird Alone,” accompanied by two-time GRAMMY winner, Alan Broadbent on piano and Harvey S., on bass.  Harvey S. was one of the members of the quartet she established in 1979.  That ensemble included Steve Kuhn and Bob Moses. On this project, Sheila and Harvey come full circle. Sheila Jordan’s album becomes the inaugural release of the SmallsLIVE Living Masters Series with the Cellar Music Group.  It marks the first ‘live’ recording of Sheila Jordan in nearly a decade.

Born in November of 1928 in my hometown of Detroit, Michigan, Jordan has a rich legacy in jazz. Now ninety-three years old, she still can swing with the best of them. Jordan is one of the pioneers of bebop and scat singing.  In her prime, she made her mark in the jazz world by performing her unique vocal style with only the double bass.  It is said that the great Charlie Parker paid her an amazing compliment by calling her “the lady with the million-dollar ears.” Sheila Jordan dared to put lyrics to the tumbling and exuberant notes of Charlie Parker’s improvised horn parts.  Sheila went to New York where jazz was thriving and studied harmony and music theory with Lennie Tristano and Charles Mingus. She was always in the company of jazz greats and striving to break musical glass ceilings for vocalists.  In New York, she was a familiar face in Greenwich Village performing with pianist Herbie Nichols. Jordan recorded with icons in experimental jazz music like George Russell.  You can hear her on his album “The Outer View” singing “You Are My Sunshine.”

In the 1960s she released her own album called “Portrait of Sheila” on the popular Blue Note label.  She also played with Don Heckman, Lee Konitz, Carla Bley and Roswell Rudd. In 1975, she recorded “Confirmation” and a year later, recorded a duet album with Arild Anderson.  But her work with George Russell gives an example of her musical direction and groundbreaking vocal attitude early in her career.  That crystal clear, emotional delivery developed with nurturing from dynamic musicians like Charlie Parker, George Russell and her husband Duke Jordan.  Below, here is her interpretation of “Confirmation” on her 1975 presentation.

As a lyricist, songwriter, and for twenty-eight years as an Adjunct Professor of Music , Sheila Jordan inspired students at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and the Vermont Jazz Center, InterplayJazz and Arts, as well as sharing her knowledge and creativity at International workshops.  This historic album become the twentieth she has recorded as a bandleader.

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PATRISHA THOMSON – “WILD IS THE WIND” – PT Designs Productions

Patrisha Thomson, vocals; Mon David, guest vocals; Steve Rawlins, piano/arranger/producer; Grant Geissman, guitar; Ken Wild, Jennifer Leitham & Bob Feldman, bass; Bernie Dresel, Bob Leatherbarrow & Gordon Peeke, drums; Brad Dutz, percussion; Scott Mayo, flute/alto flute; Tom Peterson, tenor saxophone; Michael Stever, trumpet; Ira Nepus, trombone.

Patrisha Thomson loves to sing, although she chose a career as a visual artist first and then became an educator.  Still, music and jazz were rooted deeply in her heart.  When her father passed away, Patrisha took over the presidency of his company.  With all those careers intermingling, she somehow found time for her passion to sing.  But it was much later in life that she decided to pursue becoming a recording artist.  Patrisha Thomson’s singing style is more cabaret than jazz, but she’s chosen a Bakers Dozen of familiar jazz standards to interpret. All the songs are pulled from the late 1930s through the 1940s.  Patrisha opens with the popular Ellington tune, “In a mellow Tone” where Michael Stever’s trumpet swings hard. She and her band of L.A. based musicians also cover “Dindi” and crowd pleasers like “Route 66” where Grant Geissman shines on guitar and jazz vocalist Mon David joins her as guest. Mon David puts the “J” in jazz.  Jennifer Leitham is featured on the title tune and lays her rich bass tones beneath Patrisha Thomson’s emotional delivery. Scott Mayo adds flute to the mix. Patrisha and Ken Wild open the tune, “Just Squeeze Me” made popular back in 1941, another Duke Ellington gem. “This Can’t Be Love” has a lovely Latin arrangement by Steve Rawlins. Ms. Thomson persuasively delivers Great American Songbook tunes, like “I Can’t Give You Anything but Love” that the band swings and “Autumn Leaves,” as a slow ballad. Sometimes Patrisha Thomson’s voice reminds me of days I spent in Paris, listening to the emotional female jazz singers in those blue-lit European nightclubs. She even sings Autumn Leaves in French. Her finale song is an original ‘Happy Birthday Song’ she has penned herself.

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NATALIE CRESSMAN & IAN FAQUINI – “AUBURN WHISPER” – Groundup Records

Natalie Cressman, tenor trombone/bass trombone/composer/arranger; Ian Faquini, guitar/ vocals/composer.

Natalie Cressman’s mother, Sandy Cressman, is a jazz vocalist, steeped deeply in the traditions of Brazilian music.  Natalie’s father, Jeff Cressman, is a recording engineer and trombonist who recently concluded a two-decade run with Santana. They say the apple does not fall far from the tree.  In this case, that’s absolutely correct.  The twenty-something Natalie Cressman has honed her skills singing (like her mother) in Portuguese and is quite proficient, like her father, on the trombone. She’s also a composer and lyricist. Her partner on this album is Brazilian composer and guitarist, Ian Faquini. Cressman has studied at the Manhattan School of Music and Ian Faquini studied at the California Jazz Conservatory in Berkeley and after graduating joined the faculty there. He is also on the faculty at California Brazil Camp. Clearly, both artists are super talented. Together, this duo offers a world music album of original music, with both artists contributing to the songwriting. I found their songs to be quite melodic. However, the over-dubbing of horn parts that are all quite legato often drags the music down. For example, on Track #11, “Hood River” the legato horn lines distract from what could have been a joyful, moderate-tempo tune. Some points of staccato horns could have lightened the mood and brightened the arrangement. Cressman has a light, soprano voice that is quite beautiful and Ian’s voice is a smooth baritone.  When they blend, together their sound is beautifully hypnotic. Track #2, “Rear Window” seems to be based on the chord changes of Mona Lisa, but Cressman’s voice interprets a very different melody once she sings the song and it’s lovely. When I listen to “Afoxe Pra Oxum” her voice is airy and joyful.  I wish she had incorporated some of that lightness and joy into her horn arrangements.

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ANNE WALSH – “THE ASTRUD PROJECT” –  A to Zink Music

Anne Walsh, vocals; Tom Zink, piano/arranger; Mitchell Long, guitar/cavaquinho; Kevin Winard, drums/percussion; Chris Wabich, drums; Mike Vacarro, flutes/clarinet/bass clarinet; Gary Meek, flute solos; Tony Guerrero, trumpets/flugelhorns; Andy Martin, trombone; Charlie Bisharat, violin; Tom Lea, viola; Irina Chirkova, cello.

In celebration of Brazilian jazz singer, Astrud Gilberto, Anne Walsh takes to the microphone. Astrud’s bright, clear tones helped to introduce the Bossa Nova movement of the 1960s to American audiences.  Anne Walsh, originally born in Boston and now living in Long Beach California, has a similar vocal style.  On the opening tune, “On My Mind” the happy melody dances from Anne’s lips triumphantly.  The trumpet of Tony Guerrero shares a joyful solo.  Gary Meek shines on flute during this arrangement. “Call Me” is a familiar pop tune.  Anne Walsh sings it rubato on the top and then steps into a Brazilian arrangement of this tune that is pleasant and danceable.  “Crickets” is a challenging song with swiftly moving lyric and a tempo that demands attention to both enunciation and the beautiful Latin rhythms that celebrate Brazil so naturally. Anne Walsh handles both the tempo and the Portuguese language very comfortably.  On the composition, “Take Me to Aruanda” Walsh is playful and duets with the horn.  On “Dindi” Tom Zink’s piano and the addition of Charlie Bisharat’s violin, Tom Lea’s viola and Irina Chirkova’s cello add delicate and lush beauty to this arrangement. Anne adds her own original song lyrics to the “Beach Samba” song, then scats her way through the tune.  This is Easy Listening Latin Jazz and Anne Walsh has a soothing, clear and compelling voice.

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CATHY SEGAL-GARCIA & PHILLIP STRANGE – “LIVE IN JAPAN” – Origin Records

Cathy Segal-Garcia, vocals/composer; Phillip Strange, piano.

This is a project recorded nearly thirty years ago, (1992) but it’s still fresh and exciting.  The ‘live’ performance shows off the very best of Cathy Segal-Garcia’s range and style.  It also features the wonderful and inventive piano playing of Phillip Strange.  It’s a 2-CD set, opening with “I’m In the Mood for Love” where Cathy sings the original melody, with quite a few of her own twists and complimentary turns, then stretches out to sing James Moody’s famous rendition (Moody’s Mood for Love).  This is a jazz duet that is fresh and complimentary with both artists innovative and improvising on a theme spontaneously. After all, that’s what makes jazz so wonderful.  The freedom it reflects and the intricacies of transforming the music into something fresh and new can be quite exciting. For example, they play “You’ve Changed” as an upbeat Latin number.  I enjoyed their take on “When You Wish Upon a Star.” The two musicians, offer us twenty-three songs in this double CD set. Cathy is constantly playing with time, stretching meters like taffy, but you can clearly hear the comfort level and warm camaraderie between these two musicians during this ‘live’ performance.

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MARIA MENDES – “SAUDADE, COLOUR OF LOVE” – LIVE IN AMSTERDAM with METROPOLE ORKEST CONDUCTED by JOHN BEASLEY” – Challenge Records

Maria Mendes, vocals/composer/arranger; John Beasley, conductor/arranger/orchestrator/ KeyWi/keyboards/producer/composer; Cédric Hanriot, piano/keyboards; Jasper Somsen, double bass; Mário Costa, drums/percussion.  METROPOLE ORKEST: 1st VIOLINS: Vera Laporeva, Jasper van Rosmalen, Sarah Koch, Pauline Terlouw, Christina Knoll, Saskia Frijns. 2nd VIOLINS: Herman van Haaren, Willem Kok, Ruben Margarita, Robert Baba, Xaquin Carro Cribeiro, Lonnid Nikishin; VIOLA: Norman Jansen, Mieke Honingh, Iris Schut, Isabella Petersen; CELLO: Joel Stepmann, Emile Visser, Annie Tángberg, Jascha Albracht. FLUTE: Mariël van den Bos, Janine Abbas; OBOE/ Cor anglaise; Maxime Le Minter; CLARINET: Christof May, Max Boreree; FRENCH HORN: Pieter Hunfeld.

There are few things as exciting and as challenging as singing with a full orchestra.  Maria Mendes has a voice, toned by technique and colored with emotion, that soars like another instrument atop the awesome arrangements of the Metropole Orkest conducted by John Beasley.  Mendes explores and explains the Portuguese word ‘saudade.’ This word refers to one’s desire to regain the past, hoping it will become the present again. It also represents the belief that destiny is something no one can escape. Some things are just meant to be.

“Surprisingly, I find these (meanings) comparable with love, as love can strike at any moment leaving us powerless, coloring our lives with grey as well as bright rainbow colors,” Maria Mendes explains in her liner notes.

‘Fado music’ has fused this project. It’s a music form familiar and popular with Portuguese people and fuels all those who seek nostalgic love of the past or, for that matter, love in the present. So that title of ‘Fado’ is almost a twin to ‘saudade.’  Mendes has embraced the two words during this project, combining jazz with the wonderful world of Portugal and her affection for that culture.  She offers us Portuguese Folk songs, colorfully arranged and plush with orchestration. The mastery of John Beasley as arranger and conductor shines like gold. This project is Maria Mendes’ dream-come-true album, recorded, May of 2022 in Amsterdam.  Her voice is as natural and multi-layered as the orchestra and her exquisite range soars above the instruments like a powerful bird in flight.  Maria’s range is astounding and the way she weaves jazzy scat sounds into the production is both unique and ear-catching.  John Beasley builds the production around her vocals beautifully, attentive to the details of her delivery, while all the time, enriching this amazing orchestra with his sensitive, dynamic arrangements. 

There is a photograph inside the album jacket, of a song penned expressly for Maria Mendes by Hermeto Pascoal.  He has written original, musical notes on the back of a plastic emergency exit instruction card for Maria to keep and treasure, the same way she treasures his talent and musical sensibilities. It’s a song he penned exclusively for her titled, “Hermeto’s Fado for Maria.”  She opens this arrangement with vocal scats and melodic tones, an instrument in her own right. Another favorite is track #6, the emotional ballad, “E Se Nao For Fado,” featuring Cédric Hanriot on piano. 

Here is an artistic and unusual project, infused with jazz, rich with classical overtones and culturally prominent.  it represents the Portuguese, historical, Fado folk music and the talent of Maria Mendes.  Perhaps she explained this musical experience best when she said:

“This is no Fado album.  This is no traditional jazz music.  This is an adventure that is real and can be felt by everyone, as love is.”

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