SPRING JAZZ HAS SPRUNG

By Dee Dee McNeil

March 25, 2022

GABRIEL MARK HASSELBACH – “MID CENTURY MODERN – VOL. 3” – Wind tunnel Records

Gabriel Mark Hasselbach, trumpet/flugelhorn/flute/alto flute/valve trombone/arranger/composer; Jason DeCouto, organ/bass; Nick Bracewell, Craig Scott & Paul Romaine, drums; John Lee, guitar; Mark Diamond & Miles Hill, bass; Andy Weil & Miles Black, piano.

One of the things I admire about multi-musician, Gabriel Mark Hasselbach, is his diversity.  He plays a plethora of instruments, and plays them all exceptionally well.  He also plays mainstream jazz with the same intensity and love that he gives to his contemporary artistic releases. I assume that I’m in for a treat the moment Gabriel Mark Hasselbach’s product hits my desk.  He explained this new album direction in his current press package.

“I figured I’d do something a little different for this recent album session.  The classic organ combo was the answer.  I grew up on Jimmy Smith and the whole cadre, and always had that smoky groove in the back of my mind.  Jason DeCouto, Nick Bracewell and I already had a working trio and we had all worked with John Lee (guitarist).  On these projects, rather than recording predominantly original material, as I often do, I chose soulful tunes from the fifties and sixties that have influenced me.  Songs that have a timeless quality. The result is a trifecta of jazz, where the sum is greater than the parts!”  Gabe asserts.

He opens with “Jonah’s Joint” Gabriel’s original composition and tribute to the great Jonah Jones.  It swings hard with his trumpet out front and leading the pack.  Jason DeCouto steps right up on the organ, never losing the excitement, the tempo or the groove.  He dances over the keys and his foot dances beneath them, pumping that organ like Muhammad Ali once pumped his fists against a gym boxing bag.  That’s just how hard-hitting this opening tune was.  Track #2 is another tribute tune, this time written to celebrate Blue Mitchell.  “Bring It Home to Me” shuffles along with warm harmonics by Gabriel’s trumpet and John Lee’s guitar.  Nick Bracewell is solid and power-packed on drums, locking tightly into Jason’s organ while Hasselbach solos on his trumpet.  When John Lee steps into the spotlight he doesn’t disappoint, followed by an organ solo that matches Hasselbach’s intensity.  Gabe’s friend and an icon in his own right, Randy Brecker, has contributed “Big Dipper” to the mix.  It’s a perfect composition for the organ quartet to explore.  Randy commented on this project in Hasselbach’s press package saying:

“Gabriel Mark Hasselback is constantly honing his various crafts, as a multi-instrumentalist, composer, arranger and producer.  He’s come up with a new album that is his best yet, delving into Hammond B3 Organ Trio territory.  I know that terrain well, growing up in Philly, PA (from whence this style originated) and Gabe and company are right in the groove! Poppin!!” Randy Brecker praised him.

On “Nutville” Gabriel replaces the organ with Andy Weil on piano and plays trumpet, flute, alto flute, flugelhorn and valve trombone during this arrangement.  I enjoy Gabriel’s tone and execution on alto flute during their interpretation of “Slow Hot Wind.”  He opens with the flute, then sets it aside to pick up his horn.  Beautiful!  This tune becomes one of my favorites.   The Horace Silver classic, “Senor Blues” is played with gusto by Mark Diamond’s steady and creative bass work, Weil on piano and Paul Romaine on drums.  In fact, that trio is the exciting rhythm section for tracks four through eight.  On tracks nine through fourteen, Miles Black takes to the 88-keys; Craig Scott lays down the drum grooves and Miles Hill mans the bass.  Consistently, Gabriel Mark Hasselbach contracts the best players and puts his heart and soul into the music he performs for our listening pleasure.

Hasselbach is a very lyrical trumpeter and flugelhorn player.  He has fifteen critically acclaimed albums as a bandleader and has won several JUNO Awards.  Those awards are recognitions similar to the U.S.A. GRAMMY Awards.  Hasselbach’s proud of his eleven certified Contemporary jazz Billboard hit records and his West Coast Music Award.  Additionally, he was crowned Instrumentalist of the Year at the 2011 Canadian Smooth Jazz Awards.  But this album is not Smooth Jazz.  It’s traditional jazz goodness that sprays across my listening room like summer sunshine.  It will lift your spirits and inspire you. 

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MISHA TSIGANOV – “MISHA’S WISHES” – Criss Cross Jazz

Misha Tsiganov, piano/Fender Rhodes; Boris Kozlov, bass; Donald Edwards, drums; Alex Sipiagin, trumpet/flugelhorn; Seamus Blake, tenor Saxophone.

Pianist, arranger, composer Misha Tsiganov has arranged the Gershwin tune “Strike Up the Band” as a sweet waltz at the band’s introduction. Unexpectedly, the band leaps into a fast paced, straight-ahead tempo that swings hard.  Misha takes the reins of the tune and rides it furiously on his 88-keys.  Then, the tempo takes a turn into a sultry, bluesy walk.  Seamus Blakes, on tenor saxophone, steps into view and glides across the rhythm section.  On the fade, Misha gives space for Donald Edwards to showcase his drum skills and Edwards reciprocates with fire.  Blake’s saxophone dances blissfully on top. This is one of my favorite tunes on the album. 

“…Donald and I have been together on many different projects.  I love his playing.  He knows modern vocabulary very well, plays mixed meters, crazy time signatures and the most difficult stuff with elegance,” Misha compliments his percussionist.

The artist’s title tune follows, “Misha’s Wishes.” Alex Sipiagin introduces the melody on his horn, before Boris Kozlov steps forward to showcase his beautiful double bass tones.

“Boris is the best bassist I can imagine.  His timing and power are unbelievable.  I’ve seen him swing a whole big band by himself. I’ve worked a lot in the Afro-Cuban, Salsa and Brazilian idioms and he can play all those styles, as well as mixed meters and straight-ahead,” Misha sings his bass players praises.

Misha has taken the Russian Folk Song, “There Was a Birch Tree in the Field, so What” and transformed it into straight-ahead jazz.  Alex Sipiagin spits trumpet excitement into the air with precision and technique.  He can hit those high notes on the trumpet, the way Dizzy Gillespie used to entertain us.  Misha Tsiganov’s piano solo steals the spotlight and shines.  This is another one of my favorite tunes on this album of ten songs, most of which Tsiganov has composed.  Donald Edwards pumps steadfast enthusiasm into this arrangement and never loses the spontaneity or time on his trap drums.  He is given a time to show-off all his drum skills at the close of this song and after Blake’s tenor saxophone takes a well-deserved bow.  Misha Tsiganov has put together an excellent band of musicians.  His tune, “Lost in Her Eyes” is a sensitive ballad that Misha introduces playing solo piano.  It has lovely chord changes and a pretty melody.  His solo piano sings beautifully, without accompaniment.  On “Just A Scale” the band rejoins their leader and the melody sounds exactly like the title as it moves up the scale, only changing the timing between notes.   Another favorite on this album is the Bill Evans composition, “Comrade Conrad” arranged with rich horn harmonies that sing, like background vocals, behind Misha’s sensitive piano solo.  The quintet closes with a very solemn original by Tsiganov titled, “Are You with Me?”  I was drawn to his piano solo and the emotional intensity he brought to the piece.  Here is another feather in the cap of Misha Tsiganov, stylish and entertaining as a composer, arranger and pianist.

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CALVIN JOHNSON JR., – “NOTES OF A NATIVE SON” –  Independent label

Calvin Johnson jr., tenor & soprano saxophones/vocals/composer; Ryan Hanseler, piano/Fender Rhodes; Trenton O’Neal, Alfred Jordan & Thomas Glass, drums; Evan Washington, elec. bass/piano/arranger; D’wayne Muhammad, percussion; Peter Harris, acoustic bass; Jennie Brent, violin & viola; Gabrielle Fischler, cello; Erica Falls, vocals.

The new Calvin Johnson Jr., album release displays his talents on both tenor and soprano saxophones.  However, one thing annoys me.  Jazz vocalization is as much an art as playing an instrument and serious singers spend years honing their styles and learning how to breathe, how to swing and how to sell a song.  I was not impressed with Mr. Johnson’s vocalization on the Fats Domino hit record, “I’m Walking.”  That being said, the rest of his album is palatable.  I was very pleased with the ensemble’s interpretation of “Summertime” where pianist Ryan Hanseler takes an outstanding solo and the group’s unique arrangement makes the old standard sound brand new!  

As a third-generation musician, who inherits the rich cultural legacy of New Orleans, Johnson Jr. brings a smattering of original compositions to this, his third album release.  I was particularly impressed with Track #5, “Resistance is Noble but Defeat is Imminent.”  He introduces the melody on tenor saxophone and I briefly hear traces of John Coltrane’s “Love Supreme” winding through this arrangement.  This song summersaults its way through key changes and Hanseler, on piano, brings a fresh perspective to the tune during his heavily arpeggio solo.  “Treme” settles into a beautiful melody pushed forward by the drummer’s very Ahmad-Jamal-influenced drum beat, reminding me of the Poinciana tune.  It’s a sweet arrangement.  Erica Falls is the featured vocalist on an original song called, “Streetcar Love.”  The melody is catchy, but the lyrics seem a bit outdated. The arrangement on “Lift Every Voice and Sing” is strong and the addition of strings played by Gabrielle Fischer and Jennie Brent definitely elevates the song.

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SEAN NELSON’S NEW LONDON BIG BAND – “SOCIAL HOUR!” – MAMA Records

Sean Nelson, alto trombone/trombone/electric trombone/composer/bandleader/arranger; Doug Maher, guitar; Jen Allen, piano/Hammond B3 organ/Wurlitzer; Lou Bocciarelli, electric & double bass;  Nathan Lassell, drums/percussion; Megan Weikleenget, vocals; Chris Smith, steel pans/percussion; Rob McEwan, tabla; Megan Sesma, harp; WOODWINDS: Erik Elligers, alto saxophone/flute; Tyler Wilkins, alto saxophone/flute/clarinet/ bassoon; Robert Durle, clarinet/contrabass clarinet; Cedric Mayfield, tenor saxophone/flute/clarinet/tarogato; Josh Thomas, tenor saxophone/flute/clarinet; Ryan Foley & Laura Pirruccello, flute; Megan Nelson, alto flute; Jeff Emerich, baritone saxophone/contralto clarinet. TRUMPETS: Bryce Call, Seth Bailey, Haneef Nelson & Tom Brown, trumpets/flugelhorns. TROMBONES: Leroy Loomer, trombone; Brian Sturm, bass trombone; TROMBONE ENSEMBLE: Sean Nelson & Karna Millen, alto trombone; Vince Yanovitch, Topher Logan, Colton Kinney & Luke Conklin, trombones; Wes Mayhew, Ted Adams & Zachary Haas, bass trombone.

Trombonist and composer, Sean Nelson, had a dream that manifested with this incredibly entertaining package of big band music.

“For as long as I can remember, I’ve wanted to have my own big band; an epic jazz orchestra of seventeen plus musicians.  A band that would play music old and new, tunes ranging from the roaring 20s to brand new compositions written by band members.  Most of all, a band made up of the absolute best musicians,” Sean Nelson mused in his liner notes.

The New London Big Band opens with Sean’s original composition, “Social Hour!” and it swings pretty hard.  It’s followed by a low-down, dirty blues called “Brisket and Beans” that features the fluid and blues-drenched guitar of Doug Maher.  Nelson has also composed this song.  I am intrigued by the horn arrangements and the way he has them whine and moan during this blues production.  “El Chupacabra” is another original composition by Sean Nelson and it invites strong percussive accents and smooth horn lines.  “Countin’ Freckles” is a tune that reminds me of the Count Basie days.  It invites the swing dancers to the ballroom floor.  Track #5 was composed by their pianist, Jen Allen.  Called “The Clearing” is sounds like a movie soundtrack with its many moods and tempo changes from smooth 4/4 to double time swing with an under-current of 6/8 sliding in and out of the theme.    

The Sean Nelson New London Big Band was formed in 2016 and is comprised of some of the finest musicians New England has to offer.  The title tune is the band’s theme song and an homage to their regular appearance at a club called, “The Social Bar + Kitchen” in New London, Connecticut.  Sean Nelson pushes musical boundaries when he uses his electric trombone to interpret his composition, “Freaks in Mayberry.”  Arranged with the funk drums of Nathan Lassell pushing the tune forward forcefully, it also features a pensive and soulful solo on tenor sax by Cedric Mayfield.  Their elated and energetic arrangement on “When You Wish Upon a Star” will lighten your mood and is bound to make you smile.  These ‘cats’ are everything you want in a big band and more.  Their carefully constructed repertoire will keep you entertained from beginning to end, along with their tightly packaged arrangements, stellar solos and overall great playing by this seventeen-piece orchestra.  Sit back and enjoy!

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EUBANKS-EVANS-EXPERIENCE – “EEE” – Imani Records

Kevin Eubanks, guitar; Orrin Evans, piano.

This is a duo album, and from the very first moments of listening, the peace and comfort that these two musicians recorded is palatable.  Clearly, both artists are adventurous and super talented. They share Philadelphia roots, but even more than being raised in the city of brotherly love, they each display a grittier side; they each acknowledge deep roots in the community and each strives to touch humanity through the power of sound, music and jazz.  Also, both bring decades of experience in the music business.   

Kevin Tyrone was born to Vera Eubanks on November 15, 1957 into a family rich with music history.  His mother is a gospel organist and pianist with a Master’s Degree in music education. His mom’s brother, Ray Bryant, was a celebrated jazz pianist who has worked with Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, Sarah Vaughan and even John Coltrane.  Ray Bryant also had hit records of his own.  So, young Kevin Eubanks was exposed to world-class music and entertainers throughout his life.  His first instrument was violin at age seven.  His brother, Robin, became a trombonist, arranger and tenured professor of music at Oberlin College.  His other brother, Duane, became a trumpet teacher.  Kevin also studied trumpet before finally finding his deep love for the guitar more satisfying.  While attending Berklee College of Music and moving to New York City, his career took off.  He became a respected sideman with notable jazz icons like Slide Hampton, McCoy Tyner, Sam Rivers, Roy Haynes and Ron Carter (among others).  He also formed his own group and established himself as a bandleader.  He was twenty-five when his first album was released on the Elektra label.  Kevin’s cousins, the late bassist David Eubanks and pianist Charles Eubanks appeared on this recording.  Kevin Eubanks became guitarist and Musical Director for the Tonight Show band with Jay Leno for 18-years (1992 – 2010).   Moving to Los Angeles, during that gig with the Tonight Show, he began to score film.  In November, 2010, Kevin released the CD Zen Food (Mack Avenue Records).  It debuted in the Top Five on the Billboard Jazz Chart and was Kevin’s fastest selling record ever.  In February, 2013 his CD The Messenger (Mack Avenue Records) was released, garnering a 2014 NAACP Image Award nomination for “Outstanding Jazz Album.”  That same year, he toured extensively as a member of Dave Holland’s ‘PRISM.’ In March 2015, the acclaimed Duets (Mack Avenue Records) featured Kevin pairing with fellow guitarist Stanley Jordan. That album was released to rave reviews and several concert performances.  Now he is releasing a new duet album that is sure to also receive critical acclaim.

Orrin Evans is a well-respected jazz pianist, composer and bandleader.  He has deep roots in hard bop, post-bop, rhythm and blues and neo-soul music.  Born March 28, 1975 in Trenton, New Jersey, Orrin has led an extraordinary life of musical adventures.  Although born in Trenton, NJ, Orrin was raised in Philadelphia and studied with Kenny Barron while attending Rutgers University.  He worked with the great drummer, Ralph Peterson, with Bobby Watson and Kevin Eubank’s younger brother, trumpeter Duane Eubanks.  So, these two musicians go way back.  As a serious individualist on the music scene, Orrin has released twenty-five albums as a bandleader or co-leader.  As an educator, Orrin is passionate about helping people through the power of music and artistry.  Establishing his own label, “Imani Records,” his release of Captain Black Big Band, was GRAMMY nominated.  The genres and styles Orrin plays stretch from his Philadelphia roots to embrace funk, neo/soul/acid jazz and bebop.  That wide variety has stimulated his recordings with a long list of exceptional musicians including Smoke Sessions Records release of his recent piano trio featuring bassist Christian McBride and drummer, Karriem Riggins titled, “The Evolution of Oneself.”  This duo recording with Kevin Eubanks presents opportunity for a new evolution. 

There is undeniable chemistry between these two master musicians.  Both are fearless in their musical perceptions and abilities.  The repertoire they have chosen reflects their composer abilities and the comfort they exhibit while bouncing ideas and musical interpretations off each other.  It’s a thrilling listening experience.  “I Don’t Know” is buttered down and basted in the blues.  They co-wrote this one and its down-home delicious.  It reaches back to deep roots in the people-of-color community, conjuring up ghosts of John Lee Hooker, Little Milton and Robert Johnson.  Orrin Evans colors the track with his improvised piano parts, as gritty as Gene Harris or Les McCann.  On the Eubanks/Evans composition, “And They Ran Out of Biscuits!” the duo delves into freedom of expression, a little heart and Soul along with a taste of avant-garde.  This duo combination creates both excitement and art right before your ears.  The song “Dawn Marie,” penned by Evans, is a lovely ballad.  But tunes like “Variations on the Battle” stretch my imagination and tease my musical appetite.  I had to play this cut three times, because their musicianship was so inspired and in-depth.  The duo closes with “Variations on Adoration” and I walk away, adoring this experience and appreciating the complexity that just two musicians can bring to a project.

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JOSH NELSON BOB BOWMAN COLLECTIVE – “TOMORROW IS NOT PROMISED” – Steel Bird Records

Josh Nelson, piano/composer; Bob Bowman, bass; Steve Houghton, drums; Larry Koonse, guitar; Bob Sheppard, saxophone; Clay Jenkins, trumpet.

Here is a group of musicians and close friends who have come together to create a project of beauty and depth.  Bassist Bob Bowman first met trumpeter, Clay Jenkins in 1972 at North Texas.  Shortly after, he made the acquaintance of drummer Steve Houghton and a little later, woodwind player, Bob Sheppard.  As fate would have it, they all turned up in Southern California at about the same time.  In Los Angeles, Bob would meet guitarist Larry Koonse.  The young musician was still in high school. Eventually Bowman would meet and play with Josh Nelson.  He felt an immediate connection to the pianist and they talked about recording a duo album.  All these years later, this group of seasoned jazz musicians and old acquaintances wound up in Talley Sherwood’s studio to finally make this album.  They open with the title tune, a pensive reflection on the times we live in.  Josh Nelson is the composer and penned this tune during the challenge of COVID infections worldwide.  Today, the beauty and blessing of living life continues to be challenged by war and rumors of war, political disparities and cultural changes.  So, as he reminds us with this music, “Tomorrow is Not Promised.”

Josh said, “The title of the album seems more relevant than ever these days. …I strived to convey a sense of uncertainty and mystery, but also a feeling of determination and resolve.”

Bob Sheppard composed Track #2 titled, “Your Night Your Music.”  It swings hard.  “Sometime Ago” is a beautiful waltz and the tinkling beauty of Nelson’s piano magic leaps into my listening room, with Bob Bowman’s bass setting the pace and establishing the groove.  When Bowman steps into the spotlight, his solo is innovative and imaginative.  Larry Koonse has contributed his composition, “Blues for Albert E” to the project. Bob Sheppard’s saxophone interpretation puts a capital B in Blues and Clay Jenkins displays his bright talent on trumpet   Bowman has written “Yae San” and plays the introduction a’ cappella.  The arrangement on this tune embraces Asian influences, like the title.  Koonse uses his guitar to pluck the recurring melody, before soloing.   The ensemble reinvents popular tunes like “Weaver of Dreams” where drummer Steve Houghton steps into a bright spotlight to display his talents and they arrange the familiar Miles Davis tune, “Blue in Green” in an unforgettable way, featuring Josh Nelson and Bob Bowman.  It’s got to be one of my favorites on this album.  Yes.  Bob and Josh should record a duo project.  All in all, this is music that moves as smoothly as a well-oiled machine. You can tell that these musicians know each other very well and find comfort, inspiration and creativity blending together in this project.

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MATT HALL – “I HOPE TO MY NEVER” – Summit Records

Matt Hall, trombone/composer/arranger/producer; Charlie Arbelaez, alto saxophone/composer; Louis Valenzuela, guitar; Jason Shattil, piano; Mackenzie Leighton, double bass; Kevin Kanner, drums.

Matt Hall and his ensemble swing right out the gate.  “Biscuits & Gravy” is Matt Hall’s original composition and it quickly sets the tone for this album.  The bass of Mackenzie Leighton walks briskly beneath bright, swinging horn solos and Matt Hall’s trombone tells his story with gusto.  Kevin Kanner uses drums to powerfully push the ensemble forward.  When Jason Shattil takes his solo on piano, it leaves no doubt that Hall has assembled a group of connoisseur jazz cats to interpret his arrangements. Hall is a composer of note.  His song, “I Hope to my Never” is the title of this album and a tribute to his Great Aunt Joan.  Years ago, she expressed exasperation over Matt’s constant practicing and used to exclaim, “I hope to my never.”  Now her poetic phrase of frustration has become Track #2 of Matt’s debut album.  It’s a very melodic tune with a slow swing tempo and an opening line that reminds me of the song, I thought About You.  Matt Hall’s trombone skills skip along smoothly as the melody dances. “The Thing About Sloan Hill” is another tune that swings and features the smooth guitar mastery of Louis Valenzuela.  Mackenzie Leighton steps from the background into the forefront to sing his big, bad, bass song.  The tune “Spearhead” is another one of my favorites and also an original composition by Matt Hall.  In fact, he has penned seven out of the nine songs on this album and they are all well-written and beautifully arranged.  “No Going Back” was composed by alto saxophonist, Charlie Arbelaez and it’s another sparkling gem on this production. Played at lightning speed, the track gives a platform for the soloists to shine, starting with Valenzuela on guitar.  When Arbelaez steps into the spotlight, he takes us on a spirited ride, as does Jason Shattil on the 88-keys.  Hall and Arbelaez blend perfectly, promoting melody with horn harmonies at a swift pace.  Suddenly, Kevin Kanner silences the group with his drum solo and impresses me with his dexterity and technical skills.  This group loves to ‘swing’ and so do I.  Consequently, this journalist was perfectly happy with this album from beginning to end.

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TONY MONACO – “FOUR BROTHERS” – Summit Records

Tony Monaco, Hammond B3 organ/composer; Willie B. Barthel III, drums; Kevin Turner, guitar/composer; Edwin Bayard, tenor & soprano saxes.

This is the 12th recording for Tony Monaco as a bandleader and it celebrates his half-century in the music business.  At age eight, Tony played the accordion.  But when he first heard Jimmy Smith on the organ, his fate was sealed.  He began working organ gigs in his native Columbus, Ohio while still a teenager. His early mentors were Hank Marr and Don Patterson.  He listened astutely to all the great organists including, Jimmy Smith, Jimmy McGriff, Richard “Groove” Holmes, Charles Earland, Jack McDuff and Dr. Lonnie Smith.  At age sixteen, the great Jimmy Smith called him with encouraging words.  Jimmy Smith soon became Tony’s friend and teacher.  Four years after that call, the organ master invited Tony Monaco to come play a gig at Smith’s California supper club.  Once Monaco married, to support his wife and three daughters, like many jazz musicians he worked day jobs and played gigs at night.  After years of honing his craft, In 2000, the super talented organist Joey DeFrancesco offered to produce a debut album on Monaco.  This became a catalyst for touring and Tony finally attained international success.  Summit Records released two more records, charting in Jazzweek’s Top Ten list.  This album promises to follow in those self-same footsteps.  Opening with his original composition and the title of this album, “Four Brothers” the tune slams onto the scene with Willie B. Barthel III kicking the song off on his drum set.  Barthel rolls across the drums and settles into a happy shuffle.  Edwin Bayard joins the party on his saxophone until the spotlight turns to Kevin Turner on guitar.  By the time Tony Monaco enters for his organ solo, the band has laid down a smokin’ hot groove and Tony shines like gold!   Track #2, “You Can Always Count on Me” is another Monaco original composition.  It’s melodic and well-written with a wonderful bridge.  You will enjoy the quartet’s take on “Mas Que Nada” played at an up-tempo pace.  Kevin Turner (guitarist in the group) has penned “One for Everyone,” a very catchy tune, pumped up by Willie’s shuffling drums and enhanced with Monaco’s jazzy organ solo. The quartet’s take on Strayhorn’s “Lush Life,” slows their groove down to unveil the sexy ballad.  Bayard’s saxophone opens this poignant composition with flair and beauty.  A tune called “Brothers-4” is written by Monaco’s mentor, Don Patterson.  Willie B. Barthel III sets the groove at the top of the tune, playing the drums like a melody and inviting Monaco’s organ onto the scene with power and pulse.  This is an album that uplifts the spirit and entertains in a very soulful way.  It celebrates the Columbus, Ohio jazz scene and Tony Monaco’s fifty years of powerful playing.  When he’s not recording or touring, he acts as Executive Producer of the Summit Records subsidiary, Chicken Coup Records.   He has recorded and released CDs for several undiscovered organists around the globe, passing the torch and using his role as educator and mentor to spread and cultivate many new hopefuls to the art of playing jazz organ.  Perhaps he says it best in his press package.

“After fifty great years, I want to take the opportunity to honor and thank my hometown, (Columbus, Ohio) and to find myself recognized as part of this town’s vibrant musical scene is personally very rewarding,” Tony Monaco proudly shines the spotlight on his hometown.

Additionally, he has surrounded himself with musicians who are the cream of the crop on the Ohio jazz scene.  Together, they guarantee the listener an album of fine music for now and into perpetuity.

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