CELEBRATING A FEMALE ARRANGER/COMPOSER, BLUE DAWN, LEGENDARY TRUMPETS & AN OTHER- WORLDLY DRUMMER

A TIME TO CELEBRATE A FEMALE ARRANGER/COMPOSER, BLUE DAWNS, LEGENDARY TRUMPETS AND AN OTHER-WORLDLY DRUMMER

By Dee Dee McNeil jazz journalist
Sept 15, 2019

LISA MAXWELL COMES TO TOWN: PUT OCTOBER 3RD ON YOUR CALENDAR

On Thursday, October 3rd, Catalina’s Jazz Club, in Los Angeles, will host composer/arranger Lisa Maxwell’s Jazz Orchestra and preview her “Shiny!” record release. As I began listening to Lisa Maxwell’s compositions on youtube.com, the first thing that I recognized is that her arrangements sound like movie scores. I discover I’m not too far off the mark. Lisa explained in her publicity sheet.

“My writing is heavily influenced by the TV themes of the 1970’s. They’re basically the foundation of my cultural identity. Great composers like Lalo Shiffrin, Henry Mancini, Neal Hefti and Earle Hagen underscored my life when I was growing up. I still get a tear in my eye when I listen to themes like ‘The Odd Couple’ and ‘The Bob Newhart Show.’ Like those composers, I have very definite ideas, but I write with the soloists in mind and give them freedom within the structure.”

Citing jazz great, Wayne Shorter, and the iconic arranger/composer, Gil Evans, as hugely important to her growth as a composer, Lisa Maxwell confesses to spending every available Monday night at New York’s “Sweet Basil” jazz club to hear Gil’s band perform. Quite a few of those legendary players are featured on her new album.

“I took a film scoring class at UCLA when I was seventeen and was hooked after I heard my charts played,” Lisa Maxwell explained. “Dick Grove was really my main mentor. He got me going as a writer. Then I won a Quincy Jones Arranging scholarship to Berklee College in Boston and wrote for the recording orchestra. I ended up getting some amazing gigs as a sax player, like with “Guns ‘n’ Roses”, on a Joni Mitchell Project and with Spinal Tap, but my calling is as a writer/arranger. … I often felt like I was the wrong sex, the wrong color and born at the wrong time, but I kept going for it.”

Inspired by her studies with Herb Pomeroy, who taught her Duke Ellington’s nuanced line-writing techniques, she dug into her craft. Maxwell was also inspired by trumpeter Ray Copeland, who taught her jazz arranging. Charlie Haden let her sit-in on his classes at Cal Arts in California and Lisa continued to pursue her dreams by attending the Manhattan School of Music where she studied saxophone with Joe Allard. But it was her close relationship to her dear friend, Lew Soloff, that inspired this current project. He constantly encouraged her to record her original compositions and to arrange the entire project herself. Soloff was a longtime member of the Manhattan jazz Quintet and the Mingus Big Band. He was one of the ‘regulars’ in Gil Evan’s orchestra. Most importantly, Soloff believed in the talents of Lisa Maxwell. Then, in 2015, the popular jazz trumpeter, Lew Soloff, suddenly died.

“When Lew died, I realized I had to stop thinking about it and get it done!” Lisa shared.

This Los Angeles native has spent dedicated years honing her skills and natural, creative abilities. Some of that time was spent in Los Angeles and some years were spent in Boston and New York City. Currently residing in Manhattan, Maxwell’s original music has been licensed by numerous TV series and she’s orchestrated music for Warner Brothers and a number of television shows. You may have heard her music on Sons of Anarchy, person of Interest, Dexter, Burn Notice, Four Weddings, Gravity,and she was orchestrator on all fifty-two episode of the Histeria! TV series.

It’s fabulous to see a talented female excel in the field of composition, arranging and film scoring. She and her all-star orchestra are bound to please you at their one night-only performance on Thursday, October 3, 2019. First show starts promptly at 8:30pm. Be there.

http://www.catalinajazzclub.com

WEB TICKETS: https://www.ticketweb.com/event/shiny-lisa-maxwells-jazz-orchestracatalina-bar-grill-tickets/9788725?pl=cbg
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LOUIS ARMSTRONG – “LIVE IN EUROPE” Dot Time Legends Recording

FRANCE LINE-UP: Louis Armstrong,trumpet/vocals;Jack Teagarden, trombone/vocals; Barney Bigard,clarinet; Earl Hines,piano; Arvell Shaw, bass; Sid Catlett,drums. GERMANY LINE-UP: Louis Armstrong, trumpet,vocals; Trummy young,trombone; Bob McCracken,clarinet/vocals; Marty Napoleon,piano; Arvell Shaw,bass; Cozy Cole,drums.

Imagine, stepping into a magical transformer and being whisked back in time. For a minute, just pretend you have entered a time machine. Moments later,you are sitting in a small jazz club in New Orleans. It’s 1946,and just mere feet away from your table,a young man, destined to become a living legend, is blowing his horn. Others on the scene are Jack Teagarden on trombone and Barney Bigard on clarinet. Crouched over the piano keys is Earl “Fatha” Hines. Arvell Shaw stands tall next to his double bass and Cozy Cole is slapping the trap drums. The leader, standing center stage in a dark suit and bow tie, is Louis Armstrong. The ensemble is performing together in preparation for a European tour.

It appears that eventual tour was recorded on February 22 – 23, 1948 during the Nice International Jazz Festival. It was recorded live at the famed Nice Opera House and also at the Titania Palast in Berlin, Germany. The group of musicians varies. Velma Middleton is featured, along with Louie, on vocals. Sometimes the dynamic Sid Catlett is the drummer and other times, it’s Cozy Cole. Earl Hines is the pianist in France and Marty Napoleon plays piano in Germany. But the steadfast trumpeter and star of this live production is Louis Armstrong.

This recording is part of Dot Time’s Legacy Series and these treasured tracks were recovered in forgotten, European archives of a live performance of Louie Armstrong and his All Stars in both Nice, France and later, in Germany, during a Berlin recorded broadcast on RIAS (Radio in the American Sector) files.

On the bluesy presentation of “Rockin’ Chair,” Jack Teagarden lends his smooth vocals to the mix, with Armstrong playfully answering him in his signature vocal style and adding a bit of comic relief during their duet. One thing I always admired about Louis Armstrong, (other than his amazing musical agility on his trumpet) was his penchant for entertaining. Sometimes musicians play only for themselves and each other, forgetting about the audience or having the attitude you can love it or leave it. Louie Armstrong knew that singing was a strong audience pleaser and always included this in his shows, as well as adding comedy relief. Louis Armstrong understood the importance of entertaining. The story goes that Armstrong’s manager at the time, Joe Glaser, told him before his European tour not to sing. He said they were all foreigners and didn’t speak any English. Armstrong nodded gravely, but as you hear, he paid absolutely no attention to Glaser’s instruction not to sing. In his own way, he was a serious activist, using music as his catalyst. He opened every concert singing Fats Waller’s poignant “Black and Blue” composition. It reflected the racism in America and always was received with marvelous applause and appreciation. You will hear his performance of that song on this album, along with the popular, “Sunny Side of the Street.”

He scats his way through “Them There Eyes,” as only Louie could do and I was intrigued with the blues song, “My Bucket Got a Hole In It,” featuring the boogie-woogie bass line I used to hear my own father play on our upright piano. Louis Armstrong then pays homage to his roots on “Way Down Yonder in New Orleans” and on “Mahogany Hall Stomp” the band has an on-stage jam session with Arvell Shaw making a strong statement on his bass and Barney Bigard swinging his clarinet solo boldly into the audience. Closing with “A Kiss to Build a Dream On,” Louis Armstrong leaves us a message from beyond and a promise, like a blown kiss, that love crosses all boundaries the same way great music does.
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WALLACE RONEY – BLUE DAWN – BLUE NIGHTS Highnote Records

Wallace Roney,trumpet; Emilio Modeste,tenor & soprano saxophones; Oscar Williams II, piano; Paul Cuffari,bass; Lenny White & Kojo Odu Roney,drums; Quinton Zoto, guitar.

Wallace Roney has the tone and beautiful execution on his trumpet that makes me want to bow my head and pray. I am especially taken by his interpretation of “Why Should There Be Stars,” a lovely ballad and the second tune on his stellar new album.

“Bookendz” opens his CD and it’s powerfully played by two drums: Lenny White’s funk-drums, along with Kojo Odu Roney adding his percussive licks. Oscar Williams II offers in-your-face piano brilliance. Wallace Roney recalled the first time he heard Oscar Williams II play.

“He had beautiful touch and a scope of understanding. He was shy, but I could hear that innovative spirit in him – that’s why I hired him,” Wallace Roney confessed.

The ensemble’s rhythm section magic sets the stage for Roney’s impeccable trumpet solos. Emilio Modeste not only soars on soprano saxophone, fluttering like a bird during his solo, but adds harmonic flavor with Roney as an integral part of their duo horn section. This tune introduces the players in a bright, boisterous way. I was so moved by the production on these two songs that I had to rewind and play them twice before continuing. Roney’s music can have that effect on you. His talent demands attention and sparkles under the microscope of our ear-investigation.

“Wolfbane,” a Lenny White composition, gives White an opportunity to take the percussive reins and ride his trap drums dynamically across this production, inspiring a strong, walking bass by Paul Cuffari. His bass dances along, beneath the music, in a very creative way. Quintin Zoto adds rhythm guitar to this straight ahead, take-no-prisoners tune and the rhythm section pushes the pulse, creating a stage for the horns to showcase their splendor.

“My music is uncompromising, so I look for musicians who have an expansive understanding of what’s possible and who have the ability to play above that; but who are always cognizant of what’s going on around them. I tell them to be true to who you are. Go all the way in, learn every part of what the masters have done, but let it come out ‘you’.”

All I can say is, mission accomplished!
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JASON HARNELL – “TOTAL HARNAGE” – AN OTHER-WORLDLY DRUMMER f.Boo Music

Jason Harnell, drums/vocals/synthesizer/loops/vocal percussion/comedian/ unimaginable creativity.

I have always been fascinated by drummers. They use every muscle in their bodies and practically all their limbs. They synchronize those bones, ligaments and muscles to orchestrate rhythm; to hold a group together like super glue and to inspire the listener to groove, move, dance, finger pop and enjoy the music. Drummers are a special breed of musician. That being said, Jason Harnell brings something totally fresh to this album of percussive music. Based on drum solos that he performs, Harnell adds spoken word monologues to his spontaneity. He blends in his singing abilities, harmonizing with himself and creating moods and melodies. I am reminded of the artistic and unexpected talents of Bobby McFerrin on his opening cut, “Trance” and on the fourth track titled, “Lullaby.” Jason Harnell sings all the parts over his singing drums. Harnell unapologetically displays multi-talents. His album cover portrays a character that could represent, “Captain Amazing Saves the World” the title of Harnell’s fifth track. The cartoonish figure, with Harnell’s head perched atop a bulging, muscle-toned, cartoon body in a superman-type-suit, is standing on a pile of drums. Jason Harnell describes in his monologue, a musical, jazz, super hero. A super hero who has powers to play and improvise beautiful music anytime and anywhere. However, that super hero “…could not fry an egg, or change a tire; couldn’t type or use on-line banking.” I laugh out loud! Obviously, Jason Harnell has a vivid sense of humor. I think cut #5 explains the man himself.

At six years old, after Jason Harnell played a fifteen-minute drum solo for the legendary drummer, Louie Bellson. Bellson was so impressed that he replaced the child’s toy drum kit with his own. Thus, began Jason Harnell’s search for perfection and musical, rhythmic clarity. He did all the things developing jazz musicians do. He practiced, played gigs, inter-acted with his peers and made political moves to enhance his climb to fame. The idea of presenting a solo drum show never entered his mind until a bartender/manager of the Oyster House Saloon in Studio City, California suggested he do just that. The inspired manager wanted to book Harnell as a solo act. Thus, the Jason Harnell Solo Drum Experience was conceived.

In both his live shows and on this production, Jason Harnell incorporates recorded loops, applied effects, spoken word stories and descriptive monologues, while playing his drums. He sings and harmonizes with himself. His vocals are palatable and husky. He pulls inspiration from comics and films. For example, Jason incorporates the ‘Quint the shark hunter’s’ speech from the “Jaws” movie into his drum song on his tune, “Bad Fish.”

Without a doubt, this is a unique production, inclusive of vocal percussive scatting. Harnell presents original arrangements of familiar songs like “Moon River” and “When You’re Smiling” and he’s obviously an expert on trap drums. One minute he’s Bobby McFerrin, the next he’s Elvin Jones, and then he’s Al Jarreau. The next second, he’s a Hollywood actor delivering a monologue, always accompanied by his incredible drum solos. Then, he surprises us when he sings something as pensive and sweet as “Sara Song.”

Born of a prominent musical family, his father, Joe Harnell, was a Grammy winning composer and arranger. Perhaps young Jason was tutored early on to improvise his way through life and to be unafraid to push the walls of the boxes that surround us. He is an artist unafraid to reinvent his music and himself; to use his imagination and creativity to embellish his life and his audiences. Jason Harnell shows us that he is a free spirit, brilliant percussionist, talented singer, and a totally adventurous character. If you want to experience something completely unique and unexpected, “Total Harnage” is the CD you will want to pop into your player. Then, fasten your seat belt!
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NOAH PREMINGER GROUP – “ZIGSAW: MUSIC OF STEVE LAMPERT” Independent Label

Noah Preminger,tenor saxophone;Jason Palmer,trumpet; John O’Gallagher,alto saxophone; Kris Davis,piano; Rob Schwimmer,Haken Continuum/clavinet; Kim Cass,bass; Rudy Royston,drums.

Steve Lampert is a trumpeter who has composed all the music for this project.

“Steve is absolutely brilliant,”Preminger says of the artist whose recording resumé includes five of his own albums as a leader.

“I met Steve Lampert at a gig in Greenwich Village around 2010 and we immediately struck up a deep friendship. Steve has shown me a lot about life; the way he says things just makes sense to me. Listening to and recording his music has given me a fuller perspective on the relationship between improvisation and composition, deepening the richness of my musical palette.”

“Zigsaw” is a suite of music and a metaphor for dreams that Noah Preminger experienced. In the eyes of the musicians, in the charts they read and the concept they perpetrate, Noah Preminger’s Group conceives this suite as divided into twelve main sections. Each represent a cycle of events. On the disc, you will see no division at all. The number ‘One’ glows on the CD player, as if we are on the first track for nearly an hour.

This is contemporary exploration by Noah Preminger on his tenor saxophone, endeavoring to catch his dreams and pin them, like living butterflies, on a board of velvet. You can visualize their fluttering wings spread open and straining for freedom, the way Preminger’s horn does. Steve Lampert encourages that freedom in the members of the Noah Preminger Group.

“For all my projects, I write a kind of musical virtual reality within which instrumentalists can react to the piece and with each other. I want them to be who they are as improvisers, to not tie their hands in any way, to put them in a strange new world and have them do their thing,”Steve Lampert explains his composition as it relates to the Noah Preminger musicians.

Noah Preminger hired pianist and keyboardist, Rob Schwimmer, as a wild card. Schwimmer brings a futuristic fingerboard into the project, playing the Haken Continuum, an instrument that creates more atmospheric revelations and offers unusual improvisations. This unique instrument provides a sonic element to the production. One that acoustic instruments could not have singularly captured.

Noah is the distant cousin of film director Otto Preminger and this is his fourteenth album release. In fact, he released a CD titled, “Preminger Plays Preminger” where he interpreted and wrote music associated with the films of his distant cousin. That album was released on the French, vinyl-only label, Newvelle Records. It featured Jason Moran on piano, Kim Cass on bass and drummer, Marcus Gilmore. Noah Preminger is known for pushing musical boundaries. He has garnered the DownBeat magazine’s Rising Star Best Tenor Saxophonist title and was hailed by the Boston Globe as “a master with standards and ballads, as well as an adventurous composer.” I’m certain this will be another contemporary, modern jazz album of Avant-garde music that will become an additional notch in his saxophone belt.


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CHRIS PASIN – “ORNETTIQUETTE” Planet Arts

Chris Pasin,trumpet/composer; Karl Berger,vibraphone/piano; Ingrid Serso, vocals; Harvey Sorgen,drums; Michael Bisio,bass; Adam Siegel,alto saxophone.

Jazz trumpeter,Chris Pasin, uses a host of excellent musicians to celebrate Pulitzer Prize winner and Jazz master, Ornette Coleman and his long-time collaborator, Don Cherry. Pasin’s opening tune is self-penned and titled, “OCDC.” It introduces us to each player in his ensemble, as they race to the tempo and improvise, sweeping across space with their solo efforts. Harvey Sorgen’s rolling trap drums keep the propulsive momentum steady and Sorgen is consistently creative. Michael Bisio takes an extended bass solo, with Sorgen highlighting the bass player’s step into the spotlight. Chris Pasin speaks fluidly on his trumpet and Adam Siegel answers on his alto saxophone. The tune, “Jayne” follows and is an Ornette Coleman composition. Pasin has arranged it as a smooth Latin groove with Karl Berger’s vibraphone dotting the production,like exclamation marks throughout the production. It’s a nice touch. Chris Pasin makes himself heard, soloing over the tight rhythm section, his tone both melodic and innovative. Enter Siegel on his alto saxophone, spewing creativity like confetti. This is a well-paced and exciting recording that has chosen five of Ornette’s compositions to ‘cover’ with a blanket of beauty and warm inventiveness. Pasin comfortably shares his stage with each individual ensemble player, but definitely shines on his own horn conversations. This reviewer enjoyed this production, but I was not impressed with the vocalist, whose amateur singing took away from these masterful musicians.

Chris Pasin, a master of both classical and jazz trumpet, has been an Ornette fan sense his teenaged years. He explained in his liner notes:

“I became acquainted with the music of Ornette Coleman, Don Cherry and Albert Ayler as a teenager and played along with their records. … It was not until a couple of years ago that the idea of a band playing the music inspired by these heroes occurred to me, thus engendering Ornettiquette.”

This album marks the second collaboration between Pasin and producer, Patricia Dalton Fennell for Planet Arts records. Although it was released in winter of 2018, it is such an exquisite tribute to Ornette and Don Cherry, and so well played, that I had to include it in my article that celebrates ‘legendary trumpeters.’ Chris Pasin’s work certainly falls into that category.


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2 Responses to “CELEBRATING A FEMALE ARRANGER/COMPOSER, BLUE DAWN, LEGENDARY TRUMPETS & AN OTHER- WORLDLY DRUMMER”

  1. REVIEW: Dot Time Records’ “Louis Armstrong: Live in Europe” Reviewed by Musical Memoirs - LYDIALIEBMAN.COM Says:

    […] By: Dee Dee McNeil, Musical Memoirs […]

  2. REVIEW: Wallace Roney’s ‘Blue Dawn - Blue Nights’ Reviewed by Musical Memoirs - LYDIALIEBMAN.COM Says:

    […] By: Dee Dee McNeil, Musical Memoirs […]

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