INTERNATIONAL THEMES & MUSICIANS IMPACT NEW JAZZ RELEASES

BY Dee Dee McNeil/jazz journalist

February 17,2018

Today, it appears we are in a time of world-wide turmoil. We have mass shootings in America that are killing our young people in unacceptable numbers, on our streets and in our schools. We have wars between countries all over this Earth. We have discord and disfunction in our United States government agencies and a congress that seems confused and unable to address the needs of ‘we the people,’ who actually pay their salaries and send them to Washington to do our bidding. Music becomes a wellspring of goodness that soothes during a time when our world seems so chaotic and unpredictable. If only we could get along, like the musical notes on a page that work together to create harmony. Some of these albums may hold the key to a few hours of pleasure and enlightened relaxation.

ACCENT – “IN THIS TOGETHER”
Independent Label

Jean-Baptiste Craipeau, vocal tenor 1; Simon Akesson, vocal tenor 2; Danny Fong, vocal tenor 3; Andrew Kesler, vocal tenor 4; James Rose, vocal baritone; Evan Sanders, vocal bass.

If you are a fan of vocal harmonization and beautiful a’Capella voices, you will enjoy this smart, well-performed recording. These voices are as silky-smooth and pleasant as scented oil. Their tones fit together, meticulously and musically, as precise as the innards of an antique clock. Indeed, the hum of the human voice is antique in that it is the first and earliest instrument. This group pays homage to that concept.

Accent is a group of harmonious male vocals, blended together to interpret songs that range from message music to lullabies. The members are an international blend, from France, Sweden, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. Frenchman, Jean-Baptiste Craipeau, has co-produced this project with Simon Akesson ( Swedish), Canadian members, Andrew Kesler and Danny Fong, James Rose of the UK and bass singer Evan Sanders (USA). The message of their music reflects a theme of peace and love. Heaven knows we certainly need music that inspires love and harmony on Earth, especially during these tumultuous, challenging political times. “Love Is Just That Way” is an uplifting, moderate-tempo’d piece, “Who You Are” offers an intricate waltz arrangement. I do wish they had included the lyrics as part of their compact disc package, because sometimes the lyrical message becomes lost in the harmonic vocalizations.

My favorite cut on this album is “Only One Love” that is truly a jazz arrangement and swings hard. Composed by Ian Prince, with lyrics by extraordinary vocalist/songwriter, Siedah Garrett, this last tune is the star of the show.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

EL ECO with GUILLERMO NOJECHOWICZ – “PUERTO DE BUENOS AIRES 1933”
Zoho Records

Guillermo Nojechowicz, drums/percussion/vocals; Helio Alves, piano; Fernando Huergo, bass; Kim Nazarian, vocals/percussion; Marco Pignataro, tenor & soprano saxophone; Brian Lynch, trumpet. SPECIAL GUESTS: Franco Pinna, bombo legũero/percussion; Robert Cassan, accordion; Megumi Stohs Lewis, violin; Ethan Wood, violin; Sarah Darling, viola; Leo Eguchi, cello; Nando Michelin,string arrangements.

The sultry, sexy vocals of Kim Nazarian mirrors Helio Alves’ piano melody and sets the mood for this lovely, but melancholy ballad. It’s a haunting tune that captures the attention and imagination of the listener. In the liner notes, they describe this composition titled, “Milonga Para Los Nino.” The sorrowful accordion of Roberto Cassan adds substance and mood. Percussive artist, Guillermo Nojechowicz, flavors this piece with Uruguayan rhythms and underscores it with his solid snare work. The snare represents the ugly march that Jewish captives made to concentration camps. This song was inspired by a passport that Nojechowicz’s Polish grandmother carried when she fled Warsaw for Argentina in 1933. She sheltered her grandson, Guillermo Nojechowicz’s father, on their journey to freedom, crossing Europe by train, in fear for their lives. That trip spared them from the Holocaust. This Latin jazz suite is a chronicle of their uncertain journey to safety and becomes the centerpiece of El ECO’s new recording. Each of the compositions, all written by Guilermo Nojechowicz, with the exception of Track eight, by Fernando Huergo (the bassist on this project), represent the fear, the hope, the strength of those persecuted and seeking freedom. We see the same situation reflected in the unfortunate status of ‘the Dreamers’ who were raised in America and are now being rounded up like unfortunate refugees and hunted down like prey. Even though they were brought here as children and consider this their home and their country, and most contribute positively to our society, we have people in power who want to expel them from our country.

Hopefully, this beautiful and sensitive music will remind us that we are all connected by our humanity, regardless of our religious choices, our skin tones, out cultures, or our political differences. We are all human beings. Great music bridges all these differences. We should be more like the musical notes on the page, working together in harmony.

For more about this album, see my initial review that was published, October 25, 2017, in Musical Memoirs. This CD became available in January of 2018.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

OWEN BRODER – “HERITAGE: THE AMERICAN ROOTS PROJECT”
ArtistShare Records

Owen Broder, woodwinds; Sara Casell, violin; Scott Wendhold, trumpet/flugelhorn; Nick Finzer, trombone; James Shipp, vibraphone/percussion; Frank Kimbrough, piano; Jay Anderson, bass; Matt Wilson, drums; Wendy Gilles, Kate McGarry & Yuyo Sotashe, vocals.

The first tune sounds like the film soundtrack for a Western movie. But soon, this “Goin’ Up Home” composition becomes a swinging tribute to the big band era. It transitions from melodic simplicity to a very hearty and healthy harmonic experience. The exciting addition of James Shipp on vibraphone lifts the music and brings jazz to the mix, along with the driving drums of Matt Wilson. In his liner notes, Broder says he was inspired to compose this opening song by Appalachian folk music. He just earned a 2018 Herb Albert Young Jazz Composer Award for this piece of music.

The composers of these hand-picked ‘Heritage’ songs include Owen Broder, Miho Hazama, Bill Holman, Alphonso Horne, Jim McNeely and Ryan Truesdell. They also use traditional American Folk and spiritual music. I enjoyed the solemn and unique arrangement of “Wayfaring Stranger” by Ryan Truesdell. The arranger utilizes haunting, soulful vocals by Wendy Gilles, Kate McGarry and Yuyo Sotashe. You may remember Truesdell’s name as the founder of the celebrated Gil Evans Project he produced. All the musicians and arrangers on this CD appear to have enjoyed interpreting American root music. Their talent and exuberance is obvious, stemming from New Orleans Cajun folks songs to Appalachian mountains music; from Bluegrass and gospel, to jazz. You will hear it all on this recording and unique blend of cultures and musical styles.

“Wherever the Road Leads” makes me want to Square Dance. It was composed by Miho Hazama, who is not American, but was intrigued by Appalachian music. This arranger incorporates harmonic progressions that are based on a twelve-tone idea. “Jambalaya” opens poignantly with Sara Caswell’s expressive violin. However, very slyly, the arrangement picks up tempo and excitement, adding a taste of ‘Swing’ to the mix and perhaps a tongue-in-cheek salute to the Birth of the Cool era. “The People Could Fly” has used Bantu folk music from South Africa as an inspiration. Arranger, Alphonso Horne says he was brought up in a family with South African roots and learned to sing Bantu songs in their community church. This song is based on the folk tale that a village of Africans once knew how to fly. When they were captured and put into slavery, they forgot. One elder recalled their secret gift and kept that dream alive. One day, he reminded them and they all flew away together from slavery in America back to Africa. Nick Finzer is featured prominently on Trombone. The gospel claps give the song credence and interject the slave experience of African American roots. The vocals also elevate the native African experience.

This is an interesting album, showcasing reedman/composer, Owen Broder, who is based in New York City and adds his talents to this mix of Americana music on alto, tenor and baritone saxophones. He has traveled with The Temptations, The Four Tops and has his own soul band called ‘Bitchin’ Kitchen’. His musical tastes are diverse, like this album of music. He’s worked as both bandleader and sideman and has a jazz quintet called, ‘Cowboys & Frenchmen’ that received critical acclaim for its 2015 album release, ‘Rodeo’ and a 2017 follow-up, ‘Bluer Than You Think’. He’s performed with Ryan Truesdell’s Gil Evans Project and Trio Globo.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

DOLORES SCOZZESI – “HERE COMES THE SUN”
Café Pacific Records

Dolores Scozzesi, vocals; Quinn Johnson & Andy Langham, piano; Lyman Medeiros, bass; Kevin Winard, drums; Larry Koonse, guitar; Dori Amarillio, guitar; Nolan Shaheed, trumpet.

Dolores Scozzesi tackles the Great American Songbook with an ensemble made up of Los Angeles’ best and busiest musicians. Rich Eames has done some of the arranging and the talented performer/ composer, Mark Winkler, has produced this recording. Ms. Scozzesi takes a strong cabaret approach to familiar tunes like “It’s Alright With Me,” “I’m In The Mood for Love,” and “Wild Is the Wind,” arranged as a lovely Latin Samba. Her interpretation of “You Can Leave Your Hat On,” offers tongue-in-cheek humor and is butter brushed with stage sassiness and drama. Pianist, Quinn Johnson, arranged this Randy Newman composition and it features a stellar solo by trumpeter, Nolan Shaheed. The title tune, “Here Comes The Sun,” is another Latin flavored arrangement and is happily interpreted by Dolores Scozzesi, who admits in her liner notes that she is drawn to Latin and World music. You can hear the emotion and sincerity in this artist’s voice. She is unpretentious, with an attitude and presentation emanating from someone who is obviously a seasoned performer.

Vocalist, Dolores Scozzesi, has been developing her recognizable style for several years. This New York transplant appears in jazz and cabaret rooms from France to California. In Southern California, she began her professional singing career at Budd Friedman’s popular Improvisation Comedy Club, where she sang in between comedy acts. Working here, she witnessed many budding stars perform between her singing sets like Robin Williams, Larry David and Jay Leno.

“I always try to get to the truth of who I am when I perform, and I’m entranced by singers who are totally authentic,” Ms. Scozzesi shares.

On this recording project, you will hear her absolute commitment to the lyrics and her worldly and well-lived, expressive delivery.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

JOHN RAYMOND & REAL FEELS – “JOY RIDE”
Sunnyside Records

John Raymond, flugelhorn; Gilad Hekselman, guitar; Colin Stranahan, drums.

John Raymond’s beautiful tone on his flugelhorn is the first thing that impresses me on this CD. For the past four years, this artist has been developing an identifiable trio sound, minus the bass. This creates a kind of openness in his work that is unusual. Gilad Hekselman, on guitar, brings solidarity and harmonic structure to the sound stage and Colin Stranahan holds the rhythm in place on trap drums. After the first of Raymond’s original tunes, my ear became adjusted to this bass-less production and I enjoyed the Paul Simon tune, “I’d Do It For Your Love.” Stranahan seemed not to mind that there was no bass to help him buckle down the rhythm section. He and Hekselman do a fine job on their own. The original composition, “Follower” weaves a web of melody that is set up by Raymond on his horn and later, properly explored by Hekselman on guitar. Once again, they draw me in and I’m impressed with how Stranahan holds the rhythm firmly in place all by himself. I appreciated the electric guitar’s improvisational exploration on the song, “Minnesota, WI.” Hekselman’s creativity was stunning as he danced atop his looped rhythm guitar licks. “Be Still My Soul” is a song both poignant and dirge-like, with Raymond’s flugelhorn becoming the solid nail that holds this trio in place. At times, Raymond explores the Avant Garde while soloing. I enjoyed the freedom that Stranahan displayed on his drum set, rolling the rhythm out like a bowling ball, with cymbal crashes that fall like pens at the end of a musical alley.

John Raymond is originally from Minneapolis, Minnesota but currently lives in New York City. Downbeat Magazine labeled him a ‘Rising Star Trumpeter’ in 2016. He formed this trio in 2014 and calls them ‘Real Feels.’ Raymond claims to be influenced by Art Farmer, Jim Hall and various collaborations by Ron Miles, Bill Frisell and Brian Blade. His unique trio, (“Real Feels”) have released two albums in 2016 and they continue to pave new paths down the jazzy highway, featuring their unique sounds and creativity on this “Joy Ride.” recording.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
ARNAN RAZ – “CHAINS OF STORIES
Rabbit Rabbit Rabbit Records

Arnan Raz, tenor saxophone; Eyal Hai, alto saxophone, Daniel Meron, piano; Tamir Shmerling, bass; Dani Danor, drums.

Israeli tenor saxophonist, Arnan Raz has created a CD based on a game he and his childhood friends once played. They took a single piece of paper and one person wrote a sentence in private, folded the paper to cover that sentence, then the next person wrote their sentence. They folded the paper to hide the new phrase and the next child added their sentence. At the end, ‘Chain of stories’ was created. The page was unfolded and read aloud. It had become one coherent essay. Focusing on sound, instead of words, Raz has attempted to produce his ‘chain of stories’ as an album concept. Thus, his composition titles trail like a formation of birds flying zig-zag across the back of his CD jacket. Arnan Raz explained:

“When I wrote the title song for this album, I experimented and wrote one short phrase each day without overthinking it. … After a few weeks, I had an entire song written.”

The title tune is played at a comfortable, moderate tempo and has a strong melody that does not appear to be written using distinctly different phases. Surprisingly, the haphazardly pasted music chords and melodies, strung together like random thoughts, do create a lovely melody. I think this experimental saxophonist came up with a pretty decent composition named for his childhood game. It is punctuated by Eyal Hai on alto saxophone and Dani Danor slapping his drum licks in support of a funky undertow. Tamir Shmerling adds sporadic solos on bass in between the harmonic horn punches. I found the fade on this first ‘cut’ to be a bit long and uninspired. Perhaps pianist, Daniel Meron, could have soloed on top of this repetitious horn-play. Meron opens “Her Story” the very next composition, with his piano playing in a very classical style. Arnan Raz has composed all of the music on this album. Although I commend him as a composer, I found this second tune to be repetitious and the arrangement uninspired. On the other hand, the third composition of this CD titled, “We Used to Fly” was well written and once again, further showcased the talents of Daniel Meron on piano with the tenor saxophone of Raz and the alto sax of Eyal Hai flying above the rhythm section like wild birds. All improvisational solos were inspired and expressed freedom as they unfolded. The tempo throughout this production was moderate and a more diversified rhythm arrangement on the compositions would have elevated this recording. Other favorite original tunes on this CD are “Ella,” “Two Worlds One Soul” and “Soul Talk”.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

SIMON PILBROW with the BRENT FISCHER ORCHESTRA – “COLORS OF SOUND”
Clavo Records

Simon Pilbrow, composer/piano; Brent Fischer, producer/arranger/conductor/ vibraphone/marimba/electric bass; SPECIAL GUEST ARTISTS: Ken Peplowski, clarinet; Bobby Shew, trumpet; Larry Koonse,guitar. Chuck Berghofer, acoustic bass; Ray Brinker, drums; WOODWINDS: Bob Sheppard, soprano, alto & tenor saxophones/alto flute; Sal Lozano, alto sax; Alex Budman, soprano, alto & tenor saxes/flute/alto flute/clarinet & bass clarinet; Kirsten Edkins, alto sax/alto flute; Brian Clancy, tenor sax/alto flute/clarinet; Sean Franz, clarinet; Gene Cipriano, bass clarinet; Bob Carr, baritone sax; Lee Callet, baritone sax/bass clarinet. TRUMPETS: Rob Schaer, Mike Stever, Kye Palmer, Jeff Bunnell, Ron Stout, Carl Saunders. TROMBONES: Charlie Loper, Andy Martin, Bob McChsney, Scott Whitfield. BASS TROMBONE: Craig Gosnell, Steve Hughes. STRINGS: Assa Drori, Concertmaster/principal violin; Alex Gorlovsky, Raphael Rishik, & Susan Rishik, violin; Elizabeth Wilson & Lynn Grants, viola; Maurice Grants & Kevan Torfeh, cello; Oscar Hildalgo, contrabass.

Whenever I see the name of Brent Fischer, I know that I am going to hear something of quality and excellence. Pianist, Simon Pilbrow, is very active on the Melboune, Australia jazz scene and he is a composer, with some of his copyrights held in our Library of Congress as part of the Gerry Mulligan Collection. With the direction and skills of Brent Fischer, this recording features thirty-years of Pilbrow’s composing. Music has not always been his career, but rather his passion and these songs were composed while he maintained a medical practice. Simon Pilbrow was also a fan of Brent’s famous father, Clare Fischer. Perhaps it was preordained that Pilbrow’s labor of love would be embraced by Brent Fischer, and ultimately he would make Simon Pilbrow’s original music come to life in the recording studio.

This CD opens with a happy-go-lucky arrangement, full of verve and spunk provided by soloists Carl Saunders on trumpet, trombonist Scott Whitfield and young tenor player, Brian Clancy. The tune, “Australia,” is entirely entertaining and will have you tapping your toe to the ‘Swing’ rhythm and tight horn harmonics. Pilbrow adds his piano expression, with a taste of blues glittering during his solo. “A New Beginning” is a waltz that was inspired by Pilbrow’s wife when they were courting back in 1989. Over the years, he has composed several waltzes with Jean (his wife) in mind, however this was the first one. “Studio City,” a popular Los Angeles County community, was written recently (2015) to celebrate Pilbrow’s time spent and the hospitality he felt at the home of Brent Fischer and his wife while they worked on this project.

On this recording, you will find warmth and melodic substance, arrangements that are plush with harmonics and some of the best players and studio musicians in Southern California interpreting the compositions of Simon Pilbrow. Brent Fischer and composer, Pilbrow unite to find a diverse orchestral approach with Fischer’s arrangements, sometimes using small ensembles and other times using full-blast, big band vigor or beautiful string accompaniments. It’s a heavenly match, with both the presentations and the compositions sure to please.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: