JAZZ RELEASES HIGHLIGHT NEW COMPOSERS & ARRANGEMENTS OF OLD SONGS

May 16, 2017

By Dee Dee McNeil/jazz journalist

If you appreciate the beauty of a jazz flute, you will enjoy two composers who are both outstanding flautists; Lori Bell and Ed Maina. Maina plays all the reed instruments and has composed nearly every tune on his “In the Company of Brothers” CD. Lori Bell, also a fine jazz composer, teams with the very talented guitarist, Ron Satterfield, fitting like ring to finger in a marriage of duo music. Ronny Whyte brings us his compelling piano/vocal mastery. Mari & Leo Nobre celebrate being alive with world music arrangements, covering Gershwin to Jobim and vocalist Sylvia Brooks uses a cast of West Coast, all-star musicians that add sparkle to her production. Enjoy!

LORI BELL – “BLUE(S)”
Independent label

Lori Bell, C flute/alto flute; Ron Satterfield, guitar/vocals.

Tenacious flautist, Lori Bell and guitar master, Ron Satterfield, have joined together, fitting like ring to finger, in a marriage of duo music. The theme of their current CD release is “Blue(s),” using a string of beautiful compositions that include the word ‘blue’ in each title. Beginning with the Lori Bell original composition, “Bell’s Blues”, we enjoy nearly four minutes of a very happy, straight-ahead jazz tune that is punctuated by Satterfield’s guitar, walking bass lines, and his voice echoing the melody. Bell displays her usual flare on flute, swinging hard and freely improvising; even ‘trading fours’ with Satterfield’s innovative scat singing. The Bill Evans composition, “Blue in Green” has a Brazilian arrangement, created by the gentle and persuasive strumming of Satterfield, with Bell’s flute singing sweetly atop the rhythm. Both musicians are so timely and tempo conscious, I don’t even miss the drums. Satterfield has written lyrics to the Evan’s tune and sings his prose after Bell’s awesome solo. You will enjoy the Thelonius tune, “Blue Monk”, the Joni Mitchell song, “Blue”, Oliver Nelson’s “Teenie’s Blues,” McCoy Tyner’s “Blues on the Corner”, the Miles Davis jazz standard, “All Blues” and a couple of more original compositions by the talented Ms. Bell. One of her compositions especially touched my heart entitled, “Blue Butterflies” that made the fluttering wings of the insects dance cheerfully off of my CD player. Lori and Ron blend together, like pancakes and syrup; sweet, tasty and satisfying.

The duo will celebrate the release of this CD during a concert at Dizzy’s in San Diego on Saturday, July 15 at 8PM with special guests Duncan Moore on drums and percussionist Tommy Aros.

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
RONNY WHYTE – “SHADES OF WHYTE”
Audiophile Records

Ronny Whyte, piano/vocals/arrangements; Boots Maleson, bass; Sean Harksness, guitar; Lou Caputo, tenor saxophone/flute; Mauricio De Souza & David Silliman, drums; Alex Nguyen, trumpet.

Ronny Whyte is a pianist and jazz singer with a vocal style very reminiscent of Frank Sinatra. This album offers sixteen familiar, standard. jazz tunes that feature Whyte’s sextet. It reminds this listener of sitting in a hotel lounge, sipping cocktails somewhere in America, while enjoying a seasoned veteran share his smooth vocals and competent piano playing. One thing that separates Whyte from a typical lounge singer are his composing skills. He has added five original songs on this recording. “It’s Time for Love” has a strong lyrical base and a happy-go-lucky melody. “I Love the Way You Dance,” is another well-written composition that features Alex Nguyen, resilient on trumpet. Whyte slides smoothly past some pitch problems on this tune, but his songwriting skills are strong. Other self-penned, standard-sounding songs are “Linger Awhile,” “I’ll Tell You What,” and “Blame It on the Movies.” Here is an easy listening CD that I’m certain Ronny Whyte’s fans will gobble up like M&M candy.

******************
ED MAINA – “IN THE COMPANY OF BROTHERS”
Independent Label

Ed Maina, alto & soprano saxophones/clarinet/flute & alto flute/piccolo/percussion/EWI; Rick Krive, piano/vocals; Jim Gaisor & Kemuel Roig, piano; Dave Cabrera, Jonathan Orriols & Gustavo Eraso, guitar; Gabby Vivas, Oskar Cartaya, John DiModica & Abe Laboriel, bass; Hilario Bell, Hector “Pocho” Nuciosup, Daniel Berroa & Charlie Santiago, percussion; Abner Torres, drums; Jim Hacker, trumpet/flugelhorn; Ira Sullivan, trumpet/flugelhorn; John Kricker, trombone; Javier Diaz & Carolina Herrera, vocals; Chuk Wu, prayer; Eddy Garcia, kalimba; Flute, Priscilla Wagner.
Ed Maina is a master of several horns. I’m usually prone to Alto and Tenor saxophones, but Maina makes me enjoy the beauty of each horn he plays, coloring the music like a fine portrait painter. “This Is the Moment,” is a composition opening the production. It’s so bluesy that it draws me in like quicksand. Here is smooth jazz at its best, and all the players bring excellence to this project. I’m enthralled with Jonathan Orriol’s guitar solo. The horn arrangements are complimentary and harmonic. In the liner notes, Ed Maina writes:

“My experiences at the University of Miami Jazz Department, opened up so many doors for me to play with some of the best musicians and bands in the industry. Some include Maynard Ferguson, Frank Sinatra, Chaka Khan, Natalie Cole, Jaco Pastorius … the Temptations, the O’Jays and so many more. … In 2004, I was encouraged by a close friend to record my own project. In the challenge of raising a family, teaching school and pursuing a music career … I realize why this project took thirteen years to complete. It’s also challenging to categorize the music that comes from your heart, having been influenced from Mozart to Motown and everyone in between. Obviously, I have a strong jazz and Latin jazz influence coming from South Florida. … What you’ll hear are all those influences, mixed with a lot of beautiful music from musicians I met and played with. “In the Company of Brothers” is the fruit of that endeavor.”

Maina’s self-penned composition, “You’re Still Here With Me” is delicate and emotional, with Maina’s clarinet flying like a bird across the lush, electronic background instrumentation. Gabby Vivas is solid on bass, walking creatively beneath the production and acting as the basement of the band’s structure. Maina adds Alto flute as a lovely appendage to the sensitive face of this production. When I listen to this Waltz, I am enchanted by the melody. Jim Gaisor exhibits expert chops on piano and fattens the sound.

Then comes “Quelly’s Song,” an ebullient, Latin number where Abner Torres on trap drums locks the groove down along with Hector ‘Pocho’ Nuciosup and Charlie Santiago on percussions. A nice, smooth guitar solo by Gustavo Eraso pushes the music gently ahead. Pianist Rick Krive adds his vocals to accent certain riffs with scat doubling. All the while, Maina’s supreme flute playing dominates this tune’s production. Maina features several original compositions on his CD and they are all sexy and plush with emotional character. One of the things I look for in a music project is believability and emotion. I really want to feel something when I listen and Maina’s musicianship is full of expression. This ensemble plays it all, from Latin fusion to funk; straight ahead to blues. I also love Maina’s saxophone expertise. Ed Maina and his band fit together like familiar garden plants rooted in rich soil. They blossom and grow, bursting with color and fragrance with each song. Here is a bouquet of exquisite music that brightens my home, like bunches of wild flowers or pots of fragrant, fresh herbs. It’s good for the soul.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

MARI NOBRE’S JAZZ BAND – “LIVE AND ALIVE”
Chrome Records

Mari Nobre, vocals; Leo Nobre, bass; Justo Almario, sax/flute; Angelo Metz, acoustic/electric guitar; Sandro Feliciano, drums; Daniel Szabo, piano.

On this celebration of life CD, multi-linqual vocalist, Mari Nobre, interprets songs from Benny Golson’s “Whisper Not” to Jobim’s “Corcovado” and “Chega de Saudade”. Ms. Nobre sings in Portuguese, in Spanish and in English during a ‘live’ recorded concert at the Jan Popper Theater on the campus of UCLA. Surrounded by her husband/arranger, Leo Nobre on bass, and the incomparable Justo Almario on reeds, this Italian queen holds a jazzy court. Mari Nobre was born and raised in Naples, Italy and began singing at age fourteen. She transplanted to New York , met Leo Nobre, who was playing bass with Sergio Mendes at that time. They married and moved to Los Angeles.

This project was recorded last year, only three weeks after Mari Nobre had an operation to remove cancer from her body. Thus, this musical expression becomes Nobre’s testament to life and the healing power of music. Their Brazilian arrangement on Gershwin’s “Fascinating Rhythm” is jubilant and showcases Almario’s flute and Nobre’s voice flying freely. They are like two improvisational birds. The thoughtful solo of Angelo Metz on guitar is a warm introduction to Daniel Szabo’s piano improvisation on “Corcovado”. Mari Nobre has composed one song with co-writer, Patrick Lockwood. It’s titled, “Linda” and moves at a happy Samba pace, with a staccato melody that punctuates the title. Actually, (I read in the liner notes) the Portuguese meaning of “Linda” is ‘beautiful’. Mari Nobre dedicated this song to the beauty of womanhood. “Dance Me to the End of Love” gives Leo Nobre a chance to solo on his electric bass and Almario adds his jazzy saxophone to the mix. “Frenesi” is a familiar song to my ear and Nobre lets her second soprano voice sing it with gusto. It’s a proper and energetic way to end this album.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

SYLVIA BROOKS – “THE ARRANGEMENT”
Independent label

Sylvia Brooks, vocals; Otmaro Ruiz , Jeff Colella & Quinn Johnson, piano; Christian Jacob, piano/Fender Rhodes; Sezin Ahmet Turkmenoglu, Chris Colangelo, David Hughes & Trey Henry, bass; Aaron Serfaty, drums/percussion; Tom Brechtlein, Jamey Tate & Kendall Kay, drums; Kim Richmond, alto saxophone, Bob Sheppard, tenor saxophone; Francisco Torres, trombone; Juliane Gralle, bass trombone; Brian Swartz & Michael Stver, trumpet; Ron Stout, flugelhorn; Jeff Driskill, sax; Will Brahm & Larry Koonse, guitar; Bruce Babad, flutes/sax;;

This vocalist is wrapped tightly with a blanket of excellent arrangements and wonderful musicians, who create a bed of comfort for her voice. Otmaro Ruiz, one of the pianist/arrangers on this project, has prepared silky smooth musical sheets, with his horn section punching at just the right spaces on Sylvia Brooks’ premiere tune; “Perhaps, Perhaps, Perhaps.” Aaron Serfaty’s percussion greatly compliments her arrangement, enhancing the Latin-feel. The Hank Williams country/western tune, “Cold Cold Heart” is performed as a smart blues, once again featuring a well arranged horn section. I love the production and arrangements on this CD. The vocalist has good pitch and a pretty voice. However, do I believe her lyrical stories? That is the question. Part of being a believable singer is to sell the songs and infuse them with strong, individual emotion. However, the musical productions are so strong, you easily give Ms. Brooks a pass. For example, the awesome arrangement of “Body and Soul” by Jeff Colella is fresh and captivating. Her song choices are to be commended. She offers the listener fourteen well-respected and recognizably popular songs from the Beatles to Matt Dennis; from Cole Porter to Sammy Cahn.

As a composer, Brooks co-wrote two original songs that have good lyrics and memorable melodies; “What Was I thinking (The Mirage)” and “Sweet Surrender” are well-written with stellar horn arrangements. Bravo for hiring all these amazing and accomplished musicians and arrangers. Sylvia Brooks collaboration with some of the best jazz musicians in Southern California make this project sparkle.

Sylvia Brooks will appear in concert to release her new CD on June 7, 2017 at the famed Catalina Jazz Club in Hollywood. Hit time is 8:30PM.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: